Student Well-Being Report Roundup

Childhood Weight

By Katie Ash — October 16, 2007 1 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

Children who lose weight are more likely to keep it off if they participate in a weight-maintenance treatment program, but the effects of the program wane over a period of two years, says a report published in the Oct. 10 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Conducted by a team of researchers led by professors at Washington University’s school of medicine, in St. Louis, the study looked at 150 7- to 12-year-olds in San Diego from 1999 to 2004 who took part in a weight-loss program for five months.

The researchers found that the children who had not participated in any weight-maintenance treatment program after their weight loss regained the weight they had lost, as well as an additional 2.6 percent of their original weight. Children who had completed a weight-maintenance follow-up program were more likely to keep off the weight in a short-term follow-up, but after two years, the effectiveness declined.

Related Tags:

A version of this article appeared in the October 17, 2007 edition of Education Week

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Data Webinar
Education Insights with Actionable Data to Create More Personalized Engagement
The world has changed during this time of pandemic learning, and there is a new challenge faced in education regarding how we effectively utilize the data now available to educators and leaders. In this session
Content provided by Microsoft
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
School & District Management Webinar
Accelerate Learning with Project-Based Learning
Earlier this year, the George Lucas Educational Foundation released four new studies highlighting how project-based learning (PBL) helps accelerate student learning—across age groups, multiple disciplines, and different socio-economic statuses. With this year’s emphasis on unfinished
Content provided by SmartLab Learning
School & District Management Live Online Discussion Principal Overload: How to Manage Anxiety, Stress, and Tough Decisions
According to recent surveys, more than 40 percent of principals are considering leaving their jobs. With the pandemic, running a school building has become even more complicated, and principals' workloads continue to grow. If we

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Student Well-Being Research Center Reports Student Engagement During the Pandemic: Results of a National Survey
This report examines students' school engagement during the pandemic based on survey results from students and teachers.
Student Well-Being Students With Depression, Anxiety May Qualify for Accommodations, Feds Tell Schools
As COVID fuels concerns, the Education and Justice departments detailed schools' obligations to students with mental health conditions.
3 min read
Student writes a note for "HELP" on her schoolwork
iStock/Getty
Student Well-Being Research Center Reports Student and Teacher Views of Social-Emotional Learning: Results of a National Survey
This report provides a snapshot of students' mental well-being and confidence in their SEL skills during the pandemic.
Student Well-Being From Our Research Center How to Teach Older Students Social-Emotional Skills? Try Civics
Collaboration, empathy, social awareness, and relationship building are some of the same skills that power democracy.
9 min read
Conceptual image of 3 students working on constructing a government building together.
Mary Haasdyk for Education Week