Classroom Technology News in Brief

Miami-Dade District Pauses 1-to-1 Computing Initiative

By Benjamin Herold — December 11, 2013 1 min read

Florida’s Miami-Dade County school district has “pushed the pause button” on one of the country’s largest 1-to-1 digital-computing initiatives, citing concerns about the troubled implementation of such programs in Los Angeles, Guilford County, N.C., and elsewhere.

The 354,000-student district is also rethinking its earlier preference for tablet computers and is reconsidering its original plan to give students their own devices.

In June, Miami-Dade’s school board unanimously approved a plan to borrow $63 million and lease as many as 150,000 devices, with the goal of ensuring that all students have access to a laptop or tablet and digital content by 2015. Miami-Dade also allows students to bring their own computing devices to school.

Related Tags:

A version of this article appeared in the December 11, 2013 edition of Education Week as Miami-Dade District Pauses 1-to-1 Computing Initiative

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Teaching Webinar
Meeting the Moment: Accelerating Equitable Recovery and Transformative Change
Educators are deciding how best to re-establish routines such as everyday attendance, rebuild the relationships for resilient school communities, and center teaching and learning to consciously prioritize protecting the health and overall well-being of students
Content provided by Campaign for Grade-Level Reading
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Reading & Literacy Webinar
Addressing Learning Loss: What Schools Need to Accelerate Reading Instruction in K-3
When K-3 students return to classrooms this fall, there will be huge gaps in foundational reading skills. Does your school or district need a plan to address learning loss and accelerate student growth? In this
Content provided by PDX Reading
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Equity & Diversity Webinar
Culturally Relevant Pedagogy to Advance Educational Equity
Schools are welcoming students back into buildings for full-time in-person instruction in a few short weeks and now is the perfect time to take a hard look at both our practices and systems to build
Content provided by PowerMyLearning

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Classroom Technology Opinion The Company Crowdsourcing Homework Help
Rick Hess speaks with Michal Borkowski, co-founder of Brainly, about how the site crowdsources homework questions to its millions of users.
5 min read
Image shows a multi-tailed arrow hitting the bullseye of a target.
DigitalVision Vectors/Getty
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Classroom Technology Whitepaper
Boost learning with digital games & simulations
The white paper “Games and Simulations in the Classroom” explores how interaction with phenomena through digital media supports science a...
Content provided by Carolina Biological
Classroom Technology Quiz Quiz: How Much Do You Know About Creating Effective Hybrid Learning Environments?
Quiz Yourself: How effective are your hybrid learning environments?
Classroom Technology Like Police Officers, Educators Have Been Caught on Camera Behaving Badly
Several recent incidents show how students and parents can use their cellphones to capture abusive or racist behavior by some educators.
9 min read
cellphone video 1242161726 02
Petro Bevz/iStock/Getty