Teaching Video

Teachers, Try This: Help Your Students Embrace Boredom

By Lauren Santucci — March 9, 2023 4:45
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“I’m bored.”

It’s a phrase that regularly comes out of the mouths of students.

But this Toronto teacher has found a solution. Through a 10-minute “nothing period,” in which her class is quiet and seated, Margaret Fong’s students have learned how to occupy themselves and fill their time when they have nothing to do. Some have invented games or drawn comic books; others have come to relish the opportunity to just take a breath. Fong has seen how this experience has had a positive impact on students. It’s also been particularly helpful in her split classroom, enabling her to keep one grade occupied while she works with the other.

Here, she explains how she’s incorporated this practice into her classroom and offers tips for teachers who’d like to do the same.

Lauren Santucci is a video producer for Education Week.

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