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Evolution May Get Specific Mention in Florida State Science Standards

By Sean Cavanagh — October 30, 2007 1 min read
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The theory of evolution, not mentioned in the current version of Florida’s state science standards, would be listed as one of seven “big ideas” in a proposed revision of that document.

A committee made up of science teachers, college faculty members, business representatives, and others is working on a new draft of the current document, known as the Sunshine State Standards, which was written in 1996. Kansas this year revised its standards to emphasize the teaching of evolution, after years of debate on the subject.

The proposed revisions to Florida’s standards are now open for public comment. They still need state board of education approval before becoming final, probably next year.

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See other stories on education issues in Florida. See data on Florida’s public school system.

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A version of this article appeared in the October 31, 2007 edition of Education Week

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