College & Workforce Readiness Report Roundup

Dual Credit Classes

“Dual-Credit Educational Programs in Texas”
By Catherine Gewertz — August 21, 2018 1 min read
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Taking dual-credit courses in high school doesn’t save students much time or money in college, finds a new study by the American Institutes for Research.

The study, conducted for the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, found credits from dual-enrollment programs decreased students’ average time to a college degree by only 1.2 months, about equal to one summer term.

Students who took dual-credit classes were 2.2 percentage points more likely to earn some kind of postsecondary credential, but benefits accrued primarily to white, more affluent students. Low-income students didn’t benefit from dual-credit courses.

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A version of this article appeared in the August 22, 2018 edition of Education Week as Dual Credit Classes

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