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Student Well-Being Opinion

How to Help Students Stop Procrastinating

By Katy Milkman — May 19, 2021 1 min read
How can I help students stop procrastinating?
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What’s a good tip to help students who procrastinate on homework?
I struggled with that problem and then I stumbled onto a solution—which I wrote about recently for Character Lab as a Tip of the Week:
When I was an engineering graduate student, I regularly disappointed myself.
Rather than get my schoolwork done, I’d crawl under a blanket with a juicy novel or thriller. Later, after I finally turned to studying and finished my problem sets, I couldn’t get myself to exercise.
Then one day it hit me: What if I only let myself enjoy page-turners while working out?
I tried it, and practically overnight, I stopped wasting time when I should have been studying. Instead, I started craving trips to the gym to discover what would happen next in whatever novel had me engrossed. Not only that, I enjoyed the novels and workouts more combined—I didn’t feel guilty reading, and time flew at the gym.
In my research, I’ve found that “temptation bundling"—linking something you enjoy with pursuing a valuable goal that might be a bit of a drag—can be a powerful way to achieve more without exerting much self-control.
This strategy can be used to solve all kinds of problems. For instance, you could let yourself watch your favorite Netflix show only while folding laundry, doing dishes, or tackling other chores, and you’ll watch less TV and finish more housework. Or only let yourself pick up your favorite treat—say, a vanilla latte—when heading to the library to hit the books.
Committing time to what’s best for you in the long run (like studying or exercising) is often unsatisfying in the short run, but people are wired to overvalue short-term rewards. Temptation bundling harnesses the appeal of the here and now, making your tough goals fun, not dreaded—and can help you recover wasted time in the bargain. And it’s especially helpful for the busiest among us, who can have difficulty finding time for pursuing long-term goals.
Don’t just grit your teeth and will yourself to make progress on distant goals. If an activity isn’t instantly gratifying, you’ll rarely stick with it.
Do look for a way to bundle temptations with chores and help the young people in your life do the same. Transforming goal pursuit into a pleasure is a surefire way to get further faster.

The opinions expressed in Ask a Psychologist: Helping Students Thrive Now are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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