Classroom Technology

Technical Difficulties

By Ian Quillen — October 11, 2010 1 min read
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Despite being younger and fresh out of teacher-training programs, less experienced teachers are no more likely to use technology in the classroom than their more experienced colleagues, according to a study.

The finding, one of five “myths” the study refutes about teachers and technology, challenges the assumption that growing up technology-literate translates into being comfortable using technology as a teaching—or learning—tool. The study is based on a nationwide survey of more than 1,000 K-12 teachers, principals, and assistant principals. The survey was conducted by Grunwald Associates of Bethesda, Md., in partnership with Walden University.

Teacher Tech Use and 21st-Century Skills Instruction

According to a nationwide survey, teachers who described themselves as frequent technology users were more likely to place a greater emphasis on so-called 21st-century skills instruction and to perceive a stronger effect from student technology use on the development of these skills.

SOURCE: Walden University, “Educators, Technology and 21st-Century Skills: Dispelling Five Myths”

BRIC ARCHIVE

The researchers also found that administrators and teachers often differ about how best to support technology use in schools; that teachers don’t feel they receive enough professional development to help them effectively integrate available technology into their classrooms; and that teachers who are frequent users of technology are more likely to emphasize instruction in so-called 21st-century learning skills, such as problem-solving and critical thinking (see graphic).

A version of this article appeared in the October 12, 2010 edition of Teacher PD Sourcebook

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