Teaching

The Best Advice for New Teachers, in 5 Words or Less

By Hayley Hardison — August 18, 2021 1 min read
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Cue the early-morning alarms —it’s that time of year again.

As the COVID-19 Delta variant continues to spread rapidly across the country, many things about the first day of school feel different. But one thing that isn’t changing: Teachers just entering the profession are looking for advice on how to find their footing.

We put a call out on Twitter for experienced educators to share their best tips for new teachers, in five words or less. Here’s what they said.

Foster relationships with students

Many people responding pointed to the importance of building strong relationships with students—and how critical that is for learning.

Relationships matter more than anything.
Don't stop loving your students
Make them believe they can
Enjoy your students, be yourself.
Know your students as individuals
Connect with students before curriculum.
Students learn when you care.

Mentors matter

In May, we spoke with experienced teachers, former mentees, and current mentors to uncover key components of mentorships that effectively give new teachers a solid foundation in their early careers. Here, they told us what’s worked for them and what didn’t.

Many of those who responded on Twitter spoke to the need for mentorship as well.

Find teammates that inspire you.
Find a mentor to trust.
Always ask for help
Get a mentor right away

Keep classrooms in line and lessons on track

Respondents also shared tips for behavior management and lesson planning.

Don't reinvent the wheel!
Classroom procedures are top priority!
Direct, explicit instruction works best.
Monitor and adjust!
Start smiling on day one.

Practice self-care

Self-care is frequently prescribed to protect against burnout in any profession. “I think people are starting to recognize that teachers’ well-being is really critical to their ability to perform their jobs well,” Patricia Jennings, a professor of education at the University of Virginia and an expert in teacher stress, told EdWeek reporter Madeline Will recently.

Protect your mental health/wellbeing
Be patient with yourself, too.
Get the vaccine!
Invest in yourself.

Remember who you are

Who are you when the workday begins? What about when it ends? Some respondents on Twitter advised new teachers to reflect on their identities beyond the job—and to stay true to them.

Have an identity beyond work.
Be authentic. Be yourself.
Never forget why you began
Teachers are still students

Establish a work-life balance

In July of 2020, we wrote about how remote teachers could craft a better work-life balance when there’s “no barrier between the classroom and the living room.” Maintaining a work-life balance is crucial for any setting, teachers on Twitter agreed.

Don’t forget Happy Hour times.
Never. Take. Work. Home.
Leave no later than 6pm
June, July, August.
It is all about balance!

Remember to be kind to yourself

Lastly, respondents shared advice that new teachers have likely heard before—but it’s worth remembering when times get tough.

Give yourself grace every day.
Embrace the chaos. Enjoy it.
You can make a difference.
The first version isn't perfect.
Embrace not knowing everything.
You’ll get better.

Still in search of more teaching advice? We’ve got you covered. This blog post from Education Week Opinion contributor Larry Ferlazzo houses 10 years’ worth of advice for new teachers to follow.


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