Teaching Profession

Teaching: A Wired Profession

By Francesca Duffy — October 12, 2011 1 min read
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Educators are more tech-savvy today than they were just two years ago, according to a survey overseen by Project Tomorrow, a technology-focused education nonprofit.

The findings, based on feedback compiled from 35,525 K-12 teachers, reveal a substantial increase in educators’ personal use of smartphones and Facebook, as well as a 50 percent jump in the use of podcasts and videos in classroom instruction.

According to the survey, teacher interest in teaching online classes has also grown dramatically, by 76 percent since 2008. Homework continues to be the No. 1 way that teachers use technology to aid student learning, above other methods such as using it for note taking, providing feedback, or facilitating group projects.

How Do You Use Technology to Facilitate Student Learning?

Source: Project Tomorrow, 2011

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While the survey shows high levels of teacher interest in using mobile-learning platforms, many educators still expressed concerns about student behavior problems that may arise from this type of instruction, such as students cheating on tests or becoming distracted by their electronic devices.

The survey also highlights reported gaps in school digital infrastructures and in tech training and support for teachers.

A version of this article appeared in the October 13, 2011 edition of Teacher PD Sourcebook

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