Science Download

DIY Ideas for Safe Eclipse Viewing (Downloadable)

By Vanessa Solis & Elizabeth Heubeck — March 27, 2024 1 min read
Image of a colander casting a shadow on a white paper as one way to view the eclipse using a household item.
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On April 8, the moon will pass between the Sun and the Earth in North America, darkening the sky and creating a total eclipse. This happens in the same place only once every 300-some years, making it a rare and wondrous event worth sharing with students of all ages.

However, countless students in the path of the eclipse will not have the opportunity to experience it—at least not at school. Many districts have canceled school that day due to safety concerns. School officials’ fears include the potential for traffic disruptions due to distracted drivers as the sky darkens during the eclipse, as well as possible eye damage from attempting to view the eclipse without taking proper safety precautions. But students don’t have to miss out.

Whether students will be at school or at home during this once-in-a-lifetime event, they can safely engage in witnessing the total solar eclipse by following the instructions outlined in our downloadable, courtesy of The National Aeronautics and Space Administration and other reputable science organizations. So make a pinhole projector, grab a colander, or even show kids how to use their fingers for safe viewing of an unforgettable event.

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