Student Achievement What the Research Says

The State of After-School and Summer Programs, in Charts

By Sarah D. Sparks — November 08, 2023 1 min read
Michael Crowder, 11, right, reads to Tim McNeeley, left, during an after-school literacy program in Atlanta on April 6, 2023. McNeeley, director of the Atlanta based Pure Hope Project, hosts the daily program for children in kindergarten through 5th grade.
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

While many public school students remain months or years behind academically, significantly fewer are participating in supplemental academic programs over the summer and this school year.

Fewer than 1 in 5 K-12 students participated in academic programs in public schools this summer, and about 1 in 8 are taking part in remedial or enrichment activities after school in 2023-24—both down from the last school year, according to the latest results from the federal School Pulse Panel, which came out this week.

The National Center for Education Statistics uses the panel data collection to take the monthly “pulse” of more than 1,400 K-12 schools in areas such as academic recovery, staffing, and educational activities to gauge their progress in recovering from pandemic learning disruptions.

Part of the problem is uneven and changing access. Large schools and those serving the highest concentrations of low-income students or students of color have increased their after-school offerings, with roughly 3 in 4 now providing academic enrichment or assistance outside the school day. Eighteen percent of students in high-poverty schools and 19 percent of students serving high concentrations of students of color participated in academic programs after school.

But fewer small and rural schools are offering such after-school programs in 2023-24 compared to 2022-23 school years.

“Sadly, the decline in access to after-school and summer programming is consistent with what we have been seeing—and we fear it will get worse” when federal pandemic recovery aid ends next school year, said Jodi Grant, the executive director of the Afterschool Alliance, a nonprofit advocacy group. “The parents of 25 million students want after-school programs for their children but don’t have access. We need to find ways to include more students, instead of reducing opportunities.”

While the Biden administration urged schools to use federal pandemic relief money to create summer and after-school programs to help students advance academically, only about 1 in 4 schools reported using pandemic recovery aid to support after-school academic assistance.

In a separate survey by AASA,the School Superintendents Association, more than half of district leaders said they would cut back or end enrichment and summer-learning programs in the 2024-25 school year, when relief funding ends.

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Student Well-Being Webinar
Attend to the Whole Child: Non-Academic Factors within MTSS
Learn strategies for proactively identifying and addressing non-academic barriers to student success within an MTSS framework.
Content provided by Renaissance
Classroom Technology K-12 Essentials Forum How to Teach Digital & Media Literacy in the Age of AI
Join this free event to dig into crucial questions about how to help students build a foundation of digital literacy.

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Student Achievement Spotlight Spotlight on Secondary Intervention
This Spotlight will help you measure the connection between tutoring, attendance, better test scores, and more.
Student Achievement What the Research Says What the Historic Infusion of Federal Pandemic Aid Did for Schools
Two new analyses of student-achievement data finds some benefits—but also deep inequities—for districts receiving federal recovery money.
6 min read
Conceptual image of cut out arrows up and down with money peaking through and a blue background of student hand working with pen and notebook.
Liz Yap/Education Week with iStock/Getty
Student Achievement Opinion Does Getting Rid of the 'Zero' Fuel Grade Inflation?
Not everyone thinks this student grading practice is a good idea, including some researchers and educators.
9 min read
Image shows a multi-tailed arrow hitting the bullseye of a target.
DigitalVision Vectors/Getty
Student Achievement What the Research Says How to Get Summer School Right (Hint: It’s Not Just About Academics)
A new study finds a blend of remedial and enrichment activities may improve summer programs' attendance and their effectiveness.
6 min read
Teacher Monica Villegas, an exchange teacher from Mexico, instructs students at the Twin Falls School District's migrant summer school at Oregon Trail Elementary School in Twin Falls, Idaho, on June 1, 2016. A migrant summer school helps fill education gaps while keeping children out of farm fields.
Teacher Monica Villegas, an exchange teacher from Mexico, instructs students at the Twin Falls School District's migrant summer school at Oregon Trail Elementary School in Twin Falls, Idaho, on June 1, 2016. A migrant summer school helps fill education gaps while keeping children out of farm fields.
Stephen Reiss/The Times-News via AP