Student Well-Being News in Brief

Fewer Girls Receive HPV Vaccination

By Nirvi Shah — March 26, 2013 1 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

A growing segment of parents are choosing not to have their daughters vaccinated against HPV—the human papillomavirus, which is associated with some forms of cervical and other cancers—in part because they are worried about whether the vaccine is safe.

A study published online this week in the journal Pediatrics finds that from 2008 to 2010 the percentage of parents who were not planning to have their daughters vaccinated against HPV grew from about 40 percent to 44 percent—although doctors were increasingly recommending the vaccine along with other shots. The authors analyzed data from 2008 through 2010 from the National Immunization Survey of Teens.

Some of the reasons for declining the vaccine: Parents said their children weren’t sexually active or they expressed concerns about the vaccine’s safety.

In several states, bills requiring the vaccine have been introduced. Both the District of Columbia and Virginia require it for girls.

The HPV vaccine, recommended for preteenage girls and boys by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, is most effective before children are sexually active.

Related Tags:

A version of this article appeared in the March 27, 2013 edition of Education Week as Fewer Girls Receive HPV Vaccination

Events

Classroom Technology K-12 Essentials Forum Making Technology Work Better in Schools
Join experts for a look at the steps schools are taking (or should take) to improve the use of technology in schools.
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Budget & Finance Webinar
The ABCs of ESSER: How to Make the Most of Relief Funds Before They Expire
Join a diverse group of K-12 experts to learn how to leverage federal funds before they expire and improve student learning environments.
Content provided by Johnson Controls
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
School & District Management Webinar
Modernizing Principal Support: The Road to More Connected and Effective Leaders
When principals are better equipped to lead, support, and maintain high levels of teaching and learning, outcomes for students are improved.
Content provided by BetterLesson

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Student Well-Being From Our Research Center How Much Time Should Schools Spend on Social-Emotional Learning?
District leaders and experts say what’s most important is integrating SEL skills into all academic subjects.
5 min read
Image of a teacher in a classroom working with students.
In a national survey of educators by the EdWeek Research Center last year, about 85 percent said one hour should be the maximum amount of time devoted to social-emotional learning per day.
xavierarnau/E+
Student Well-Being School Counselors Sound Cry for Help After Buffalo Shooting
For many schools, the May 14th shooting rampage in Buffalo prompted staff discussions on how they might respond differently.
6 min read
A Buffalo police officer talks to children at the scene of Saturday's shooting at a supermarket on Sunday, May 15, 2022, in Buffalo, N.Y. A white 18-year-old wearing military gear and livestreaming with a helmet camera opened fire with a rifle at the supermarket, killing and wounding people in what authorities described as “racially motivated violent extremism.”
A Buffalo police officer talks to children at the scene of Saturday's shooting at a supermarket on Sunday, May 15, 2022, in Buffalo, N.Y. A white 18-year-old wearing military gear and livestreaming with a helmet camera opened fire with a rifle at the supermarket, killing and wounding people in what authorities described as “racially motivated violent extremism.”
Joshua Bessex/AP
Student Well-Being Spotlight Spotlight on Mental Health
This Spotlight will help you assess the stressors affecting student mental health, explore mental well-being resources in schools, and more.

Student Well-Being Spotlight Spotlight on Healthy Schools
This Spotlight will help you discover how health and wellness can create a transformative school environment and more.