Student Well-Being

Children & Families

April 02, 2003 2 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

After-School Programs

New York City students who participated in after-school programs sponsored by the After-School Corp. for three years had higher academic gains and improved their school attendance at a faster rate than similar students who didn’t take part in the programs, says a study.

“Evaluation of Programs Supported by the After-School Corporation,” is available from Policy Studies Associates.

Conducted by Policy Studies Associates, a Washington-based research company, the study found that students in those programs increased their standardized-test scores in mathematics an average of 6 points more than students who were not in the programs.

The largest and most immediate increases came for students considered most at risk of academic failure. For example, African-American students were able to raise their math scores after one year in the programs. Among Hispanic students and those from low-income families, gains in the subject were seen after two years.

In reading and language arts, however, participants and nonparticipants alike performed about the same.

Researchers also found that while school attendance decreased for nonparticipants from grades 5 and 8, attendance improved after one year for those in the after-school programs.

The new research by Policy Studies Associates is part of an ongoing study of 30,000 students at more than 90 After-School Corp. programs. Formed in 1998 by the Open Society Institute, a private foundation in New York City, the After- School Corp. is a nonprofit organization that brings private and public sector funding together to provide after-school programs. About 45,000 K-12 students at 264 schools are being served.

The report also provides a view of the effectiveness of after-school programs that contrasts with the recent portrayal by a study of the federal government’s $1 billion 21st Century Community Learning Centers program.

That earlier study, by Mathematica Policy Research Inc., of Princeton, N.J., concluded that the program, established during the Clinton administration, has had few positive effects on students’ academic performance or behavior. President Bush cited those findings in recommending a budget cut for the 21st Century program.

Judy Y. Samelson, the executive director of the Afterschool Alliance, a Washington- based umbrella organization, praised the new study, saying it answers questions that the Mathematica study lacked the data to address.

— Linda Jacobson ljacobson@epe.org

Related Tags:

Events

Jobs Virtual Career Fair for Teachers and K-12 Staff
Find teaching jobs and other jobs in K-12 education at the EdWeek Top School Jobs virtual career fair.
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Teaching Webinar
Challenging the Stigma: Emotions and STEM
STEM isn't just equations and logic. Join this webinar and discover how emotions fuel innovation, creativity, & problem-solving in STEM!
Content provided by Project Lead The Way
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Professional Development Webinar
Leveraging Student Voice for Teacher Retention & Development
Join our webinar on using student feedback to improve teacher performance, retention & student achievement.
Content provided by Panorama Education

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Student Well-Being Quiz Quiz Yourself: How Much Do You Know About Teens’ Tobacco and Nicotine Use?
Answer these seven questions about students’ nicotine and tobacco habits.
1 min read
A high school principal displays vaping devices that were confiscated from students in such places as restrooms or hallways at the school in Massachusetts on April 10, 2018.
A high school principal displays vaping devices that were confiscated from students in such places as restrooms or hallways at the school in Massachusetts on April 10, 2018.
Steven Senne/AP
Student Well-Being Q&A A Superintendent Explains Why Her District Is Suing Social Media Companies
Student mental health and behavioral issues have become a major drain on district resources as social media use has risen.
3 min read
Teenage girl looking at smart phone
iStock/Getty
Student Well-Being Opinion When Students Feel Unlucky, Teachers Can Help Change That Attitude
Mindsets matter when it comes to thinking about opportunity. Here’s what new research finds.
Paul A. O'Keefe
2 min read
Images shows a stylized artistic landscape with soothing colors.
Getty
Student Well-Being A Mental Health Screening Saved Students’ Lives in This District
A district that deployed a universal mental health screening was able to intervene immediately with five students who had suicide plans.
4 min read
Vector illustration of a counselor or psychologist holding a clipboard in one hand and an umbrella above in the other over an anxious woman who is tucking her head into her knees with a tangled line hovering above her head.
iStock/Getty