Science A State Capitals Roundup

Utah House OKs Bill to Trump NCLB Law

By Michelle R. Davis — February 23, 2005 1 min read
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The Utah House approved two bills last week aimed at putting state education priorities ahead of requirements mapped out in the federal No Child Left Behind Act.

The House unanimously approved a bill on Feb. 15, sponsored by Rep. Margaret Dayton, a Republican, that said the state’s policies for determining student achievement should take precedence over federal policy where there is a conflict, particularly if federal money isn’t provided.

House lawmakers also passed a resolution, introduced by another Republican, Rep. Kory M. Holdaway, saying Utah’s own accountability system, the Utah Performance Assessment System for Students, or U-PASS, should get priority over the accountability mandates under the federal law.

The bills now move to the Senate for consideration.

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A version of this article appeared in the February 23, 2005 edition of Education Week

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