Teaching Profession News in Brief

More Variation Seen in Evaluation Scoring

By Stephen Sawchuk — September 10, 2013 1 min read
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Early results from Louisiana’s most recent teacher evaluations show more variation in teachers’ scores than appeared in prior systems, though a big majority of teachers—89 percent—were deemed proficient or “highly effective” in 2012-13, according to a report issued last week.

The analysis from the Louisiana education department found that 4 percent of teachers were rated ineffective, an increase from less than 1 percent in 2010-11 under the previous system.

Like many other states, Louisiana has revamped its teacher-evaluation system to use both observations of teachers and student-achievement data. For about 30 percent of teachers, the ratings include “value added” information based on growth in test scores.

The results are roughly in line with early results from other revamped evaluation systems, most of which continue to show a relatively small percentage of ineffective teachers.

A version of this article appeared in the September 11, 2013 edition of Education Week as More Variation Seen in Evaluation Scoring

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