Special Education

ESEA Renewal Session Focuses on ‘Special’ Groups

By Alyson Klein — December 01, 2009 1 min read

Federal officials gearing up for reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act are getting a clearer idea of how advocates for a number of special populations—including English-language learners, students in special education, and homeless children—hope to see the law reshaped.

They aired those views at the U.S. Department of Education’s second “stakeholder forum” held in Washington recently, aimed at laying the groundwork for reauthorization of ESEA, whose current version is the No Child Left Behind Act. (“ESEA Action High Priority, Duncan Says,” Sept. 30, 2009.)

Kris Gutierrez, a professor at the University of Colorado at Boulder who studies ELLs, suggested that schools track those students after they leave the classroom, and said they need to be assessed for continued progress.

Patricia Popp, a representative from the Virginia Education Program for Homeless Children and Youth, noted that support staff for homeless students often are the first laid off during an economic downturn. She suggested that Congress make sure it provides adequate funding for homeless students through the federal McKinney-Vento program, which finances support services for that population.

Jane West, a lobbyist at the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education, in Washington, noted that both the ESEA and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act are up for reauthorization at the same time. She suggested that, rather than aligning the two laws, Congress actually consider merging them.

And Deborah Ziegler, a lobbyist for the Council for Exceptional Children, which advocates for students in special education, said she hopes that special education teachers would be eligible for alternative pay, such as salary bonuses for boosting student achievement.

The department plans to hold more such forums in coming months. Renewal of the ESEA has been pending since 2007. Department officials gave no sense of how soon they plan to release the administrations blueprint for reauthorization.

A version of this article appeared in the December 02, 2009 edition of Education Week as Renewal Ideas Fly at Forum on ESEA

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Professional Development Webinar
Building Leadership Excellence Through Instructional Coaching
Join this webinar for a discussion on instructional coaching and ways you can link your implement or build on your program.
Content provided by Whetstone Education/SchoolMint
Teaching Webinar Tips for Better Hybrid Learning: Ask the Experts What Works
Register and ask your questions about hybrid learning to our expert panel.
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Families & the Community Webinar
Family Engagement for Student Success With Dr. Karen Mapp
Register for this free webinar to learn how to empower and engage families for student success featuring Karen L. Mapp.
Content provided by Panorama Education & PowerMyLearning

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Superintendent, Coeur d'Alene Public Schools
Coeur D'Alene, Idaho
Hazard, Young, Attea & Associates
Director of Headstart
New Haven, CT, US
New Haven Public Schools
Director of Headstart
New Haven, CT, US
New Haven Public Schools
Supervising Behavior Analyst (BCBA)
Weston, Florida, United States
Camelot Education

Read Next

Special Education What Biden's Pick for Ed. Secretary Discussed With Disability Rights Advocates
Advocates for students with disabilities want Biden to address discipline and the effects of COVID-19 on special education.
2 min read
Miguel Cardona, President-elect Joe Biden's nominee for Secretary of Education, speaks after being introduced at The Queen Theater in Wilmington, Del., Wednesday, Dec. 23, 2020, as Biden, right, and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris, look on.
Miguel Cardona, President-elect Joe Biden's nominee for Secretary of Education, speaks after being introduced at The Queen Theater in Wilmington, Del., Dec. 23, 2020, as Biden, right, and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris, left, look on.
Carolyn Kaster/AP
Special Education Schools Struggled to Serve Students With Disabilities, English-Learners During Shutdowns
The needs of students with IEPs and English-language learners were not often met after the pandemic struck, says a federal report.
3 min read
Young boy wearing a mask shown sheltering at home looking out a window with a stuffed animal.
Getty
Special Education How Will Schools Pay for Compensatory Services for Special Ed. Students?
States’ efforts so far suggest there won’t be enough money to go around for all the learning losses of students with disabilities from COVID-19 school shutdowns.
8 min read
student struggling blue IMG
iStock/Getty
Special Education Bridging Distance for Learners With Special Needs
The schooling services that English-language learners and students with disabilities receive don’t always translate well to remote learning. Here’s how schools can help.
9 min read
Special IMG
E+/Getty