Families & the Community

Special Education PTA First of Its Kind in Kentucky

January 12, 2010 1 min read
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Parents of special education students in a Kentucky school district have formed their own Parent Teacher Association to represent their unique needs, an article in the Louisville Courier-Journal reports.

The group, which formed in March in Oldham County, offers support and resources to parents and works to improve communication with the district. School officials say they hope it’s a model for other districts in the state and around the nation, the article said.

The article reports there are as many as 170 special education PTA groups across the nation.

“What it comes down to is that it’s the right thing to do for children,” Chuck Saylors, the president of the national PTA, told the Courier Journal. “I know there’s not as many (groups) as we need out there.”

A version of this news article first appeared in the On Special Education blog.

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