Opinion
Student Well-Being Letter to the Editor

Fed-Up Food-Services Manager Speaks Out About Parents

April 26, 2011 1 min read

To the Editor:

I have worked in food services for 27 years, and I’ve seen a lot of kids. I have seen kids come to school on Monday weak from hunger. I fed them so they could go to class because their parents were drinking and using drugs all weekend. I’ve had kids cry because they were hungry. I manage a junior high school cafeteria and, every day, I see kids sent to school with a candy bar or chips (“School-Meals Makeover Stirs the Pot,” April 6, 2011).

Today, everything is about being obese. To some degree it is, but the biggest problem is the parents—not all, but some. I have seen teenage girls throwing up, becoming pale and weak, to keep from being obese. It all breaks my heart.

Parents give the kids money and send them to McDonald’s for their supper so they won’t have to move out of their chair for the rest of the night. This is what makes kids obese ... their parents. They don’t teach them to learn and work for what they want. They are the ones that teach their kids. There are so many kids out there that need food to survive, and they are not getting it at home.

Our cafeteria provides well-balanced meals. These kids need at least one good meal a day to survive. The problem is not in the schools, it’s in the homes. There are thousands of kids who need what we provide. I have seen them for 27 years.

Ann Bates

School Cafeteria Manager

Paragould, Ariz.

Related Tags:

A version of this article appeared in the April 27, 2011 edition of Education Week as Fed-Up Food-Services Manager Speaks Out About Parents

Events

Jobs The EdWeek Top School Jobs Virtual Career Fair
Find teaching jobs and other jobs in K-12 education at the EdWeek Top School Jobs virtual career fair.
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Mathematics Webinar
Engaging Young Students to Accelerate Math Learning
Join learning scientists and inspiring district leaders, for a timely panel discussion addressing a school district’s approach to doubling and tripling Math gains during Covid. What started as a goal to address learning gaps in
Content provided by Age of Learning & Digital Promise, Harlingen CISD
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Curriculum Webinar
How to Power Your Curriculum With Digital Books
Register for this can’t miss session looking at best practices for utilizing digital books to support their curriculum.
Content provided by OverDrive

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Student Well-Being What the Research Says Child Abuse Cases Got More Severe During COVID-19. Could Teachers Have Prevented It?
A study finds that the severity of identified child abuse cases grew during the pandemic, even as reports of abuse declined.
3 min read
Image of a sad girl in the shadows
iStock/Getty Images Plus
Student Well-Being The Pandemic Brought Universal Free School Meals. Will They Stay?
Relaxed rules during the COVID-19 pandemic have allowed schools to serve universal free meals. Some in Congress want to make that permanent.
8 min read
Kejuan Turner, 8, eats a burger from a free bagged lunch provided by the Jefferson County School District on the back of his mother's truck with his brother, Kendrell, 9, outside their home in Fayette, Miss.
Kejuan Turner, 8, eats a burger from a free bagged lunch provided by the Jefferson County school district on the back of his mother's truck with his brother, Kendrell, 9, outside their home in Fayette, Miss., in March.
Leah Willingham/AP
Student Well-Being What the Research Says Getting Face Time With Students May Be More Important Than You Think
There's a good reason for teachers and students to keep their cameras on in class, a new neuroscience study suggests.
3 min read
Mashea Ashton, principal and founder of Digital Pioneers Academy, drops in to different Zoom classes to see how students and teachers are doing.
Mashea Ashton, the principal and founder of Digital Pioneers Academy, drops in on a Zoom class. New research shows ways teachers can build better bonds with students online.
Jaclyn Borowski/Education Week
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Student Well-Being Whitepaper
SEL as a Plan to Slow the Impact of Learning Loss
In this discussion, we will discuss the impacts of learning loss during the pandemic, the inequities that have emerged during this time, ...
Content provided by Center for Responsive Schools