Education

President Salutes Young Heroes

February 12, 1986 2 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

President Reagan focused not only upon the family as the nation’s “moral core” but on children themselves in his annual State of the Union address last week.

“Tonight, I want to speak directly to America’s younger generation,” the President said, “because you hold the destiny of our nation in your hands.” Warning of the dangers of permissiveness, the President told young listeners that “the call of the future is too strong, the challenge too great, to get lost in the blind alleyways of dissolution, drugs, and despair.”

And to underscore that message, Mr. Reagan saluted the achievements of four young people, whom the Reagans had invited to attend the speech.

Addressing his guests, the President said: “We look at you and know it is true--in this land of dreams fulfilled where greater dreams may be imagined, nothing is impossible, no victory is beyond our reach, no glory will ever be too late.”

Of Richard Cavoli, 21, a student at Union College in Schenectady, N.Y., who had developed an experiment carried on the Challenger shuttle mission, Mr. Reagan said: “All his life he has been enthralled by the mysteries of medicine and science. Richard, we know that the experiment that you began in high school was launched and lost last week. Yet, your dream lives. And as long as it is real, work of noble note will yet be done--work that could reduce the harmful effects of X-rays on patients, and enable astronomers to view the golden gateways of the farthest stars.”

Of Tyrone Ford, 12, of Washington, D.C., the President said: “We see the dream glow in the flowering talent of 12-year-old Tyrone Ford. A child prodigy of gospel music, he has surmounted personal adversity to become an accomplished pianist and singer. He also directs the choirs of three churches and has performed at the Kennedy Center. With God as our composer, Tyrone, your music will be the music of angels.”

Tyrone, a 6th grader at the Sacred Heart School, is studying at the 12th-grade level.

The President noted the courage of Shelby Butler, 13, of St. Joseph, Mo., who was on safety-patrol duty when she lunged into the path of an out-of-control bus to pull a little girl to safety.

And the President said: “We see the dream born again in the joyful compassion of 13-year-old Trevor Ferrell.” Two years ago, Trevor, who lives in Gladwyne, Pa., organized a volunteer campaign to cook and deliver meals and clothing to the destitute in the Philadelphia area. “Trevor, yours is the living spirit of brotherly love,” President Reagan said.

Related Tags:

A version of this article appeared in the February 12, 1986 edition of Education Week

Events

Classroom Technology Webinar How Pandemic Tech Is (and Is Not) Transforming K-12 Schools
The COVID-19 pandemic—and the resulting rise in virtual learning and big investments in digital learning tools— helped educators propel their technology skills to the next level. Teachers have become more adept at using learning management
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Data Webinar
Using Integrated Analytics To Uncover Student Needs
Overwhelmed by data? Learn how an integrated approach to data analytics can help.

Content provided by Instructure
School & District Management Live Online Discussion Principal Overload: How to Manage Anxiety, Stress, and Tough Decisions
According to recent surveys, more than 40 percent of principals are considering leaving their jobs. With the pandemic, running a school building has become even more complicated, and principals' workloads continue to grow. f we

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Education Gunman in 2018 Parkland School Massacre Pleads Guilty
A jury will decide whether Nikolas Cruz will be executed for one of the nation’s deadliest school shootings.
3 min read
Annika Dworet and her husband, Mitch Dworet, wipe away tears as their son's name is read aloud during Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooter Nikolas Cruz's guilty plea on all 17 counts of premeditated murder and 17 counts of attempted murder in the 2018 shootings, at the Broward County Courthouse in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. on Wednesday, Oct. 20, 2021. The Dworet's son, Nicholas Dworet, 17, was killed in the massacre.
Annika Dworet and her husband, Mitch Dworet, wipe away tears as their son's name is read aloud during Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooter Nikolas Cruz's guilty plea on all 17 counts of premeditated murder and 17 counts of attempted murder in the 2018 shootings, at the Broward County Courthouse in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. on Wednesday, Oct. 20, 2021. The Dworet's son, Nicholas Dworet, 17, was killed in the massacre.
Amy Beth Bennett/South Florida Sun Sentinel via AP
Education Briefly Stated: October 20, 2021
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
8 min read
Education Gunman in Parkland School Massacre to Plead Guilty
The gunman who killed 14 students and three staff members at a Florida high school will plead guilty to their murders, his attorneys said.
4 min read
Parkland school shooter Nikolas Cruz is sworn in before pleading guilty, Friday, Oct. 15, 2021, at the Broward County Courthouse in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., on all four criminal counts stemming from his attack on a Broward County jail guard in November 2018, Cruz's lawyers said Friday that he plans to plead guilty to the 2018 massacre at a Parkland high school.
Parkland school shooter Nikolas Cruz is sworn in before pleading guilty, Friday, Oct. 15, 2021, at the Broward County Courthouse in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., on all four criminal counts stemming from his attack on a Broward County jail guard in November 2018, Cruz's lawyers said Friday that he plans to plead guilty to the 2018 massacre at a Parkland high school.
Amy Beth Bennett/South Florida Sun Sentinel via AP
Education California Makes Ethnic Studies a High School Requirement
California is among the first in the nation to require students to take a course in ethnic studies to get a diploma starting in 2029-30.
4 min read
FILE - In this Jan. 22, 2020, file photo, Democratic Assembly members, from left, James Ramos, Chris Holden Jose Medina, and Rudy Salas, Jr., right, huddle during an Assembly session in Sacramento, Calif. Medina's bill to make ethnic studies a high school requirement was signed into law by California Gov. Gavin Newsom on Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)