Classroom Technology

Country’s Largest Ed-Tech Conference Is a Virtual Experience During COVID-19

By Alyson Klein — November 29, 2020 1 min read
BRIC ARCHIVE
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

Next week will kick off an International Society for Technology in Education conference like no other.

At the start of 2020, ISTE, the ed-tech community’s largest conference, was scheduled to be in person, in Anaheim, Calif. But then COVID-19 hit. ISTE announced this summer that it would still hold the event, but it would be later in the year, from Nov. 29 to Dec. 5. And it would be all virtual.

Richard Culatta, the CEO of ISTE, said he and the group’s leadership team spent the spring and summer attending virtual conferences. And they found many of them were less than inspiring. So they decided their own conference would be an “immersive, interactive” event, with plenty of opportunities for networking or just catching up and exchanging ideas with other conference-goers.

If you read the session titles for ISTE 2020, you won’t see a lot of references to “COVID-19", “the pandemic”, or “hybrid learning.”

That is by design, Culatta said.

Almost all the sessions will tackle a particular topic. such as digital citizenship, through the lens of COVID-19.

Some of the sessions originally planned for this conference have been pushed off to next year’s event. Others were asked to retool for the current context. And still others were added to meet the demands of the moment. ISTE surveyed numerous districts and found that educators were most interested in learning how to do authentic assessment online, and build inclusivity for all types of learners. So it revamped the program to put a special emphasis on those topics.

For now, ISTE is hoping to hold its 2021 conference in San Antonio, in late June, as originally scheduled. But the event may include some sort of online component, Culatta said.

A version of this news article first appeared in the Digital Education blog.

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Data Webinar
Working Smarter, Not Harder with Data
There is a new paradigm shift in K-12 education. Technology and data have leapt forward, advancing in ways that allow educators to better support students while also maximizing their most precious resource – time. The
Content provided by PowerSchool
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
School & District Management Webinar
Deepen the Reach and Impact of Your Leadership
This webinar offers new and veteran leaders a unique opportunity to listen and interact with four of the most influential educational thinkers in North America. With their expert insights, you will learn the key elements
Content provided by Solution Tree
Science K-12 Essentials Forum Teaching Science Today: Challenges and Solutions
Join this event which will tackle handling controversy in the classroom, and making science education relevant for all students.

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Classroom Technology Spotlight Spotlight on Interactive Technology
This Spotlight will help you consider what changes are on the horizon with the metaverse, parent privacy concerns, and virtual SEL options.
Classroom Technology Opinion How Schools Can Stem the Toxic Tide of Technology
Students' relationships, motivation, mood, sleep, and safety—all are at risk, writes researcher Andy Hargreaves.
Andy Hargreaves
5 min read
Illustration of girl using computer
Yulia Sutyagina/iStock/Getty Images Plus<br/>
Classroom Technology The Number One Reason Students Still Lack Internet at Home: Parents Can't Afford It
Many families can't afford the cost of internet connectivity, even if they live in areas that are wired for broadband, a new report shows.
2 min read
Image of a student working on a computer from home.
iStock/Getty
Classroom Technology Facebook, Twitter, and TikTok Make Teachers' Jobs More Difficult and Dangerous, Union Says
Social media spreads misinformation and emboldens students to damage school property, the National Education Association says.
2 min read
Image of hands on a keyboard with social media icons popping up.
Urupong/iStock/Getty