Find your next job fast at the Jan. 28 Virtual Career Fair. Register now.
Special Education

Special Education

February 18, 2004 1 min read

Parents and ADHD

Parents of many children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder should themselves be treated for the same condition, a recent study says.

Researchers at the University of Maryland College Park found that parents of children with the condition are 24 times more likely to have the disorder themselves than parents of children without ADHD.

In the study, published in the December 2003 edition of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, researchers at the ADHD program in the university’s psychology department evaluated 98 children ages 3 to 7 with ADHD and 116 without the disorder, along with their parents. The participants are part of a 10-year study following the long-term progress of children with ADHD who were originally recruited at the universities of Chicago and Pittsburgh.

Researchers used psychological tests to measure both the parents’ and children’s behavioral and mental-health problems and ADHD symptoms.

The study also found that when preschoolers with ADHD suffer from other serious behavioral problems, their parents are two to five times more likely to themselves suffer from a wide range of mental-health problems, including depression, anxiety, and drug addictions.

The parents’ problems may prevent them from taking an active or supportive enough role in the treatment of their children’s disorders, said Andrea Chronis, the study’s lead author and the director of the ADHD program at the University of Maryland.

“When you have a child who has ADHD, it is so important for us to look more broadly at what is going on with the parents,” Ms. Chronis said. “We know when parents have psychological problems it can negatively impact the benefits of treatment for their child.”

About 2 million school-age youngsters in the United States have ADHD, according to the National Institute of Mental Health. The condition, which is characterized by hyperactivity, short attention spans, and impulsive behavior, can interfere with a child’s education.

“This study is in no way blaming the parent,” Ms. Chronis emphasized. “We just have to ask ourselves how can we assess and treat the whole family unit.”

—Lisa Goldstein

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
School & District Management Webinar
Branding Matters. Learn From the Pros Why and How
Learn directly from the pros why K-12 branding and marketing matters, and how to do it effectively.
Content provided by EdWeek Top School Jobs
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
School & District Management Webinar
How to Make Learning More Interactive From Anywhere
Join experts from Samsung and Boxlight to learn how to make learning more interactive from anywhere.
Content provided by Samsung
Teaching Live Online Discussion A Seat at the Table With Education Week: How Educators Can Respond to a Post-Truth Era
How do educators break through the noise of disinformation to teach lessons grounded in objective truth? Join to find out.

EdWeek Top School Jobs

BASE Program Site Director
Thornton, CO, US
Adams 12 Five Star Schools
Director of Information Technology
Montpelier, Vermont
Washington Central UUSD
Great Oaks AmeriCorps Fellow August 2021 - June 2022
New York City, New York (US)
Great Oaks Charter Schools
Director of Athletics
Farmington, Connecticut
Farmington Public Schools

Read Next

Special Education Schools Struggled to Serve Students With Disabilities, English-Learners During Shutdowns
The needs of students with IEPs and English-language learners were not often met after the pandemic struck, says a federal report.
3 min read
Young boy wearing a mask shown sheltering at home looking out a window with a stuffed animal.
Getty
Special Education How Will Schools Pay for Compensatory Services for Special Ed. Students?
States’ efforts so far suggest there won’t be enough money to go around for all the learning losses of students with disabilities from COVID-19 school shutdowns.
8 min read
student struggling blue IMG
iStock/Getty
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Special Education Whitepaper
Dyslexia: How to Identify Warning Signs at Every Grade
Read the new whitepaper by Dr. Pamela Hook to learn how to recognize the warning signs of dyslexia at different grade levels.
Content provided by Lexia Learning
Special Education Bridging Distance for Learners With Special Needs
The schooling services that English-language learners and students with disabilities receive don’t always translate well to remote learning. Here’s how schools can help.
9 min read
Special IMG
E+/Getty