Teaching Profession Federal File

NCLBlogging

By Michelle R. Davis — January 24, 2006 1 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

As politically oriented Web logs become increasingly popular, more education groups are setting out to join the sometimes-edgy medium. The 1.3 million-member American Federation of Teachers last week stepped into the cyber arena with a blog that is part of its campaign geared toward the scheduled 2007 reauthorization of the No Child Left Behind Act. The blog is called “NCLB, Let’s Get It Right.”

Two AFT employees, identified only as John and Michele, are doing the blogging, and calling attention to what the union views as problems with the federal law. In a blog entry last week, they had called attention to an editorial in The Washington Post encouraging the dismissal of District of Columbia teachers who lacked proper certification.

Commenting on the Post’s editorial, John wrote that the dismissed teachers could wind up in the city’s charter schools. The No Child Left Behind law, he wrote, “is opening up markets for uncertified teachers even as it demands that teachers in regular public schools meet stricter requirements.”

AFT spokesman Alex Wohl said the blog was “a place for our members to go when they want to think seriously about the law.”

Mr. Wohl said that although the AFT takes positions on various aspects of the federal law, the blog will welcome thoughtful opposing views. He pointed out that the site, at www.letsgetitright.org/blog, includes a disclaimer that the blog does not necessarily represent the official views of the teachers’ union.

Barbara Hunter, the communications director of the National School Boards Association, who also oversees that organization’s Web log—BoardBuzz at boardbuzz.nsba.org—said groups like hers must walk a fine line.

“Blogs can be cheeky and informational, and for organizations, we have to maintain a delicate balance between being too outlandish and really delivering information in a lively way,” she said.

But Andrew J. Rotherham, a co-founder of the think tank Education Sector, who runs a popular blog, Eduwonk.com, that frequently comments on federal education policy, said organizations hosting blogs often find walking that fine line difficult.

“I have yet to see a blog affiliated with an institution … that doesn’t create headaches for the organization or end up being really boring,” he said. “The AFT has historically said lots of interesting things, so I hope it’s a blog that proves my contention wrong.”

A version of this article appeared in the January 25, 2006 edition of Education Week

Events

Jobs Virtual Career Fair for Teachers and K-12 Staff
Find teaching jobs and other jobs in K-12 education at the EdWeek Top School Jobs virtual career fair.
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Reading & Literacy Webinar
Science of Reading: Emphasis on Language Comprehension
Dive into language comprehension through a breakdown of the Science of Reading with an interactive demonstration.
Content provided by Be GLAD
English-Language Learners Webinar English Learners and the Science of Reading: What Works in the Classroom
ELs & emergent bilinguals deserve the best reading instruction! The Reading League & NCEL join forces on best practices. Learn more in our webinar with both organizations.

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Teaching Profession Opinion How I’m Keeping Ahead of Burnout: 4 Tips for Teachers
An English teacher shares her best advice for battling the long-haul blahs until spring break.
Kelly Scott
4 min read
Young woman cartoon character making step from gloomy grey rainy weather to sunny clear day.
iStock/Getty + Education Week
Teaching Profession Opinion Why Is the Nation Invested in Tearing Down Public Education?
Education professor Deborah Loewenberg Ball argues that panic over test scores keeps us from building on the strengths of our children.
Deborah Loewenberg Ball
5 min read
Illustration of school text books and wrecking ball.
F. Sheehan for Education Week / Getty
Teaching Profession Teachers Censor Themselves on Socio-Political Issues, Even Without Restrictive State Laws
A new survey from the RAND Corporation found that two-thirds of teachers limit their instruction on political and social issues in class.
4 min read
Civics teacher Aedrin Albright stands before her class at Chatham Central High School in Bear Creek, N.C., on Tuesday, Nov. 5, 2019. The class is debating whether President Trump should be impeached. The House impeachment inquiry into Trump’s dealings with Ukraine has become a teachable moment in classrooms around the country as educators incorporate the events in Washington into their lesson plans.
Civics teacher Aedrin Albright stands before her class at Chatham Central High School in Bear Creek, N.C., on Tuesday, Nov. 5, 2019. The class was debating whether President Trump should be impeached. A new national survey found that a majority of teachers are now limiting instruction on political and social issues in class.
Allen G. Breed/AP
Teaching Profession 10 Major Challenges for Substitute Teachers
Substitute teachers want more support to do their jobs well. One state has identified their top concerns.
4 min read
Illustration of people climbing stacks of books. There are 3 stacks of books at different heights with people helping people climb up.
iStock/Getty