Teaching Profession Federal File

NCLBlogging

By Michelle R. Davis — January 24, 2006 1 min read

As politically oriented Web logs become increasingly popular, more education groups are setting out to join the sometimes-edgy medium. The 1.3 million-member American Federation of Teachers last week stepped into the cyber arena with a blog that is part of its campaign geared toward the scheduled 2007 reauthorization of the No Child Left Behind Act. The blog is called “NCLB, Let’s Get It Right.”

Two AFT employees, identified only as John and Michele, are doing the blogging, and calling attention to what the union views as problems with the federal law. In a blog entry last week, they had called attention to an editorial in The Washington Post encouraging the dismissal of District of Columbia teachers who lacked proper certification.

Commenting on the Post’s editorial, John wrote that the dismissed teachers could wind up in the city’s charter schools. The No Child Left Behind law, he wrote, “is opening up markets for uncertified teachers even as it demands that teachers in regular public schools meet stricter requirements.”

AFT spokesman Alex Wohl said the blog was “a place for our members to go when they want to think seriously about the law.”

Mr. Wohl said that although the AFT takes positions on various aspects of the federal law, the blog will welcome thoughtful opposing views. He pointed out that the site, at www.letsgetitright.org/blog, includes a disclaimer that the blog does not necessarily represent the official views of the teachers’ union.

Barbara Hunter, the communications director of the National School Boards Association, who also oversees that organization’s Web log—BoardBuzz at boardbuzz.nsba.org—said groups like hers must walk a fine line.

“Blogs can be cheeky and informational, and for organizations, we have to maintain a delicate balance between being too outlandish and really delivering information in a lively way,” she said.

But Andrew J. Rotherham, a co-founder of the think tank Education Sector, who runs a popular blog, Eduwonk.com, that frequently comments on federal education policy, said organizations hosting blogs often find walking that fine line difficult.

“I have yet to see a blog affiliated with an institution … that doesn’t create headaches for the organization or end up being really boring,” he said. “The AFT has historically said lots of interesting things, so I hope it’s a blog that proves my contention wrong.”

A version of this article appeared in the January 25, 2006 edition of Education Week

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Equity & Diversity Webinar
Culturally Relevant Pedagogy to Advance Educational Equity
Schools are welcoming students back into buildings for full-time in-person instruction in a few short weeks and now is the perfect time to take a hard look at both our practices and systems to build
Content provided by PowerMyLearning
Classroom Technology Webinar Making Big Technology Decisions: Advice for District Leaders, Principals, and Teachers
Educators at all levels make decisions that can have a huge impact on students. That’s especially true when it comes to the use of technology, which was activated like never before to help students learn
Professional Development Webinar Expand Digital Learning by Expanding Teacher Training
This discussion will examine how things have changed and offer guidance on smart, cost-effective ways to expand digital learning efforts and train teachers to maximize the use of new technologies for learning.

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Teaching Profession Opinion Teachers Were Told to 'Give Grace' as the Pandemic Started. They Did That and Much More
Districts offered little guidance otherwise, writes researcher Lora Bartlett.
Lora Bartlett
4 min read
Illustration of teachers working
F. Sheehan/Getty
Teaching Profession Educators of Color: Schools Need to Better Support Racial Justice Efforts
A new survey of educators of color finds that few received any training for addressing racism and violence with their students.
5 min read
Image of a teacher and students.
nadia_bormotova/iStock/Getty
Teaching Profession Opinion I've Studied Teachers for 20 Years. The Pandemic Was Their Ultimate Challenge
Researcher Lora Bartlett wondered what was happening behind the scenes as teachers' cheerful voices radiated from her daughters' computers.
Lora Bartlett
4 min read
Opinion Bartlett1 KNOW THYSELF LINCOLN
Lincoln Agnew for Education Week
Teaching Profession Q&A Teachers' Union President: Say 'No to Censorship, and Yes to Teaching the Truth'
National Education Association President Becky Pringle discusses some of the challenges and priorities for the nation's largest teachers' union.
8 min read
National Education Association President Becky Pringle delivers a keynote address.
National Education Association President Becky Pringle delivers a keynote address at the union's representative assembly in early July.
Moses Mitchell/National Education Association