Curriculum

Majority of Educators Believe Parents Should Be Involved in Curriculum Choices

By Ileana Najarro — December 17, 2021 1 min read
Illustration of a parent and child outside of a school building.
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

Parents across the nation are seemingly up in arms about the ways teachers talk about race, LGBTQ identities, religion, and climate change. They’re confronting school board members, recording and posting classroom lessons on social media and urging politicians to crack down on what’s allowed to be discussed in class.

How do educators feel about the issue?

Last month, the EdWeek Research Center in a nationally representative survey asked more than 1,300 district leaders, school leaders, and teachers how they feel about teaching politicized topics in the classroom, and about parental involvement in choosing or weighing in on the selection of curricula and learning materials.

Here’s what they said.

*Respondents are district leaders, principals, and teachers.

SOURCE: EdWeek Research Center survey, 2021

Related Tags:

A version of this article appeared in the January 12, 2022 edition of Education Week as Majority of Educators Believe Parents Should Be Involved In Curriculum Choices

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Assessment Webinar
The State of Assessment in K-12 Education
What is the impact of assessment on K-12 education? What does that mean for administrators, teachers and most importantly—students?
Content provided by Instructure
Jobs January 2022 Virtual Career Fair for Teachers and K-12 Staff
Find teaching jobs and other jobs in K-12 education at the EdWeek Top School Jobs virtual career fair.
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Reading & Literacy Webinar
Proven Strategies to Improve Reading Scores
In this webinar, education and reading expert Stacy Hurst will provide a look at some of the biggest issues facing curriculum coordinators, administrators, and teachers working in reading education today. You will: Learn how schools
Content provided by Reading Horizons

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Curriculum Librarians Fight Back Against Efforts to Ban Books in Schools
Book defenders have employed a variety of strategies, including petition drives, protests, and direct pressure on school board members.
David Montgomery, Stateline.org
8 min read
Amanda Darrow, director of youth, family and education programs at the Utah Pride Center, poses with books that have been the subject of complaints from parents in recent weeks on Thursday, Dec. 16, 2021, in Salt Lake City.
Amanda Darrow, director of youth, family and education programs at the Utah Pride Center, poses with books that have been the subject of complaints from parents.
Rick Bowmer/AP Photo
Curriculum From Our Research Center The Topics That Lead Book Ban Requests, According to School Leaders
A new survey of teachers, principals, and district leaders sheds some light on book ban and censorship requests.
3 min read
Image show a page of fiction with black marks hiding sentences or words.
Getty
Curriculum Opinion The Evidence-Based, Broadly Appealing Way to Teach Kids How to Succeed
There is broad-based support for teaching that getting a degree, job, and married—before kids—makes one more likely to avoid poverty.
3 min read
Image shows a multi-tailed arrow hitting the bullseye of a target.
DigitalVision Vectors/Getty
Curriculum Opinion Data Science Is the Future. Let's Start Teaching It
The subject needs to be part of rigorous math prep leading to college and careers, argues Freakonomics author Steven D. Levitt.
Steven D. Levitt
4 min read
Conceptual illustration of a data being examined through a smart phone
Ben Currie for Education Week