Teaching Profession News in Brief

Ind. Performance-Pay Plan Benefits Well-to-Do Districts

By The Associated Press — January 10, 2017 1 min read
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Teachers in some of Indiana’s wealthiest school districts will get the largest share of $40 million in performance pay that the state made available this year for high-performing educators, with urban districts seeing much less.

Data released by the Indiana education department show the Carmel Clay schools leading the state in the most performance money per teacher, at more than $2,400, while the Indianapolis public schools will receive nearly $130 per teacher, and Wayne Township will get among the lowest payments, at just more than $40 per teacher, The Indianapolis Star reported.

The incoming Republican superintendent of public instruction, Jennifer McCormick, has said she wants lawmakers to review the pay, arguing that the current strategy does not provide an adequate incentive to attract and retain teachers.

Schools get the bonuses based on ISTEP student-exam scores and graduation rates. Money is then given to teachers who earn high marks on their yearly evaluations.

A version of this article appeared in the January 11, 2017 edition of Education Week as Ind. Performance-Pay Plan Benefits Well-to-Do Districts

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