College & Workforce Readiness Report Roundup

GED Diploma

By Catherine Gewertz — September 21, 2010 1 min read

A new study suggests that the General Educational Development, or GED, program offers a key pathway to college for those who didn’t finish high school. Yet, it also notes that few GED recipients go far enough along that pathway to reap most of its benefits.

The study was released last week by the American Council on Education, the Washington-based group that administers the GED.

It found that, among GED recipients who passed the exam in 2003, nearly 43 percent enrolled in postsecondary education within six years. Of those who went on to enroll in postsecondary education programs, however, fewer than 12 percent completed them within six years. Just half stuck around for a second semester, suggesting the first semester represents a high hurdle for many GED students.

Also, most of the GED-passers who enrolled in college chose programs of two or fewer years. They tended to earn associate degrees, while regular-diploma recipients earned bachelor’s degrees, which carry higher future wages than do two-year degrees.

A version of this article appeared in the September 22, 2010 edition of Education Week as GED Diploma

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Student Well-Being Webinar
How Districts Are Centering Relationships and Systemic SEL for Back to School 21-22
As educators and leaders consider how SEL fits into their reopening and back-to-school plans, it must go beyond an SEL curriculum. SEL is part of who we are as educators and students, as well as
Content provided by Panorama Education
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Student Achievement Webinar
The Fall K-3 Classroom: What the data imply about composition, challenges and opportunities
The data tracking learning loss among the nation’s schoolchildren confirms that things are bad and getting worse. The data also tells another story — one with serious implications for the hoped for learning recovery initiatives
Content provided by Campaign for Grade-Level Reading
Student Well-Being Online Summit Student Mental Health
Attend this summit to learn what the data tells us about student mental health, what schools can do, and best practices to support students.

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

College & Workforce Readiness Letter to the Editor Are Students Ready for Post-Pandemic Reality?
Schools must make improving students' essential skills a priority for college and career success, says the CEO and president of CAE.
1 min read
College & Workforce Readiness This Is Not a Good Time to Fall Off the College Track. Students Are Doing It Anyway
Fewer students in the Class of 2021 are applying for college financial aid, continuing a drop that started last year.
6 min read
Applications for the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) form are on the decline.
Applications for the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) form are on the decline.
Jon Elswick/AP
College & Workforce Readiness Student Interest in Health-Care Careers Takes Off During Pandemic
The coronavirus crisis is boosting a trend toward health-care and medical pathways. The challenge is getting students hands-on training.
7 min read
Nurse giving man injection
Getty
College & Workforce Readiness Thanks to COVID-19, High Schoolers' Job Prospects Are Bleak. Here's How Schools Can Help
The economic fallout from COVID-19 is speeding up workforce changes and vulnerable students are at greater risk of falling behind.
8 min read
African-American teen boy using laptop
Getty