Science Quiz

Do You Know as Much as Students Do About Climate Change? Quiz Yourself

By Arianna Prothero, Madeline Will & Hyon-Young Kim — November 23, 2022 1 min read
Global warming illustration, environment pollution, global warming heating impact concept. Change climate concept.
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Climate change is constantly in the news and cemented into our political discourse. Unseasonal temperatures are now part of our obligatory pleasantries about the weather. Despite that, many American adults are confused about what, exactly, is causing climate change and misconceptions abound.

The same is true for U.S. teens, according to a new survey by the EdWeek Research Center.

Take our short quiz below to test your own knowledge of climate change (and see how you stack up against today’s high school students).

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Climate Change
Heat. Fires. Floods. Learn how climate change affects school infrastructure and curriculum, and how students and schools are responding.
June 9, 2022

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Coverage of how climate change is affecting students’ learning and well-being is supported in part by a grant from the Education Writers’ Association Reporting Fellowship program, at www.ewa.org/fellowship. Education Week retains sole editorial control over the content of this coverage.

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