College & Workforce Readiness A National Roundup

D.C. Program Aims to Help Students Graduate From College

March 26, 2007 1 min read

More than 2,000 low-income students in the District of Columbia will receive intensive support and scholarships to help them graduate from high school and college over the next decade, under an initiative announced last week.

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation is committing nearly $122 million to help address the low rates of college completion among young people in the nation’s capital.

Students will be selected in the spring of their junior year, based on indicators that measure resilience and a demonstrated commitment to education. They will receive college scholarships of up to $10,000 a year for no more than five years.

The initiative involves a range of partners, from the Gates Foundation and District of Columbia officials to the D.C. College Success Foundation and the D.C. College Access Program. The latter two will administer key components of the initiative.

See Also

See other stories on education issues in District of Columbia. See data on the District of Columbia’s public school system.

For background, previous stories, and Web links, read College Access.

A version of this article appeared in the March 28, 2007 edition of Education Week

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