College Access & Completion

College & Workforce Readiness Letter to the Editor How We Can Improve College-Completion Rates
Early- and middle-college high schools have the potential to improve college completion rates, says this letter to the editor.
May 10, 2021
1 min read
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College & Workforce Readiness Fewer Students in Class of 2020 Went Straight to College
First-year college enrollment dropped steeply last year, a study finds, and the declines were sharpest among poorer students.
Dalia Faheid, April 6, 2021
6 min read
Rowers paddle along the Charles River past the Harvard University campus in Cambridge, Mass. on March 7, 2017.
Rowers paddle along the Charles River past the Harvard University campus in Cambridge, Mass.
Charles Krupa/AP
Law & Courts U.S. Supreme Court Is Asked to Take Up Harvard's Consideration of Race in Admissions
Lower courts rejected claims by Students for Fair Admissions that the Harvard policies discriminate against Asian-American applicants.
Mark Walsh, February 25, 2021
3 min read
College & Workforce Readiness Collection Where Are They Now? COVID-19 and the Class of 2020
A worsening economy, a surging pandemic, and school disruptions create new hurdles on the road to college.
October 21, 2020
High school senior Alexis Campbell of Fayetteville, Ga., visited George Washington University in Washington before the coronavirus pandemic forced schools to shut down live, on-campus tours for prospective students. Now she is considering whether to enroll in a school closer to home in the fall.
High school senior Alexis Campbell of Fayetteville, Ga., visited George Washington University in Washington before the coronavirus pandemic forced schools to shut down live, on-campus tours for prospective students. Now she is considering whether to enroll in a school closer to home in the fall.
Courtesy of Alexis Campbell
Classroom Technology 'Summer Melt' Could Be a Flood as Seniors Shift College Plans
Faced with uncertainty, new financial concerns, and the prospect of more remote learning, and confusion, a growing number of college-bound high school seniors are reconsidering where and whether they’ll pursue higher education.
Gabrielle Wanneh, April 24, 2020
6 min read
College & Workforce Readiness Video From the Pueblo to College: The Journey of Two Rural Students, Chapter 3: ‘A home to come back to’
Rural students don’t go to college in the same numbers that their urban or suburban peers do. And for rural students of color whose families or communities are of limited means, the numbers are even lower. But there are many success stories—and Education Week wanted to tell one.
Erin Irwin, December 20, 2019
5:45
College & Workforce Readiness Opinion From the Pueblo to College: The Journey of Two Rural Students
What does it take for rural students to succeed academically? This three-part video series follows two Native American students as they transition from high school to higher education and explores what their decisions mean for their families and their Jemez Pueblo community.
December 20, 2019
College & Workforce Readiness Video From the Pueblo to College: The Journey of Two Rural Students, Chapter 1: 'Not giving up on school'
For several months in 2019, Education Week followed two college-bound students—Temeya Gachupin and Justin Madalena—who come from the Pueblo of Jemez in New Mexico, so that we could tell their personal and academic stories.
Erin Irwin, December 19, 2019
7:12
College & Workforce Readiness Video From the Pueblo to College: The Journey of Two Rural Students, Chapter 2: ‘I’m going to miss her’
For students who choose to go to college, where they come from can be a big predictor of their ability to succeed in higher education. Rural students don’t go to college in the same numbers that their urban or suburban peers do. And for rural students of color whose families or communities are of limited means, the numbers are even lower. But there are many success stories—and Education Week wanted to tell one.
Erin Irwin, December 19, 2019
6:42
Families & the Community Briefly Stated Briefly Stated: Stories You May Have Missed
A collection of short news stories from this week.
December 10, 2019
7 min read
Long Beach State is part of the 23-campus California State University system, where officials are pushing to raise freshman admissions standards by requiring an additional high school course in math, science, or "quantative reasoning." The proposal has brought strong pushback from some school districts and advocates who argue it will make access harder for black, Latino, and low-income students.
Long Beach State is part of the 23-campus California State University system, where officials are pushing to raise freshman admissions standards by requiring an additional high school course in math, science, or "quantative reasoning." The proposal has brought strong pushback from some school districts and advocates who argue it will make access harder for black, Latino, and low-income students.
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College & Workforce Readiness California State University Wants to Raise Admissions Standards. Will It Shut Out Black and Latino Students?
The nation’s largest public university is pushing to raise minimum standards for freshman admissions—a move that has galvanized opposition from advocates and some districts that argue it puts more roadblocks in the path of students who already struggle to meet current requirements.
Christina A. Samuels, November 19, 2019
8 min read
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College & Workforce Readiness Opinion School Counselors Support Students. Are We Supporting Them?
We desperately need to level the playing field in college admissions, writes Mandy Savitz-Romer. School counselors are a good place to start.
Mandy Savitz-Romer, October 22, 2019
5 min read
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College & Workforce Readiness Opinion Four Proven Ways to Put Students on the Path to College
We must teach students to resist the narrative that they don't belong in college, argues Chicago charter school college admissions director Robert Lane.
Robert Lane, October 21, 2019
5 min read
College & Workforce Readiness Does Higher Ed Really Pay Off? New Gates-Funded Commission Aims to Find Out
As the cost of college rises and students go deeper into debt, families are increasingly asking whether higher education is worth the cost. A new commission is tasked with helping to answer that question.
Catherine Gewertz, May 16, 2019
3 min read