Curriculum

About This Series

December 13, 2000 1 min read

This is the first installment of a three-part series about teachers in Antarctica.

Education Week will journey to that continent along with teachers in the National Science Foundation’s Teachers Experiencing Antarctica and the Arctic program, which sends teachers to the polar regions to participate in cutting- edge scientific research.

Assistant Editor David J. Hoff and Photo Editor Allison Shelley (see “Behind the Scenes”) were selected by the NSF to be “media visitors” for approximately two weeks in January.

Every year, the independent federal agency runs a competitive program to select several members of the news media to travel to Antarctica to write about NSF-financed research. Education Week, the Los Angeles Times, the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, National Geographic, and National Public Radio were chosen to send journalists to Antarctica during this latest round of competition. The agency provides the journalists with transportation, outdoor clothing, food, and shelter while on the continent.

Early next month, Mr. Hoff and Ms. Shelley are scheduled to arrive at McMurdo Station, the largest research facility in Antarctica and the entry point for all visitors to the continent.

If the itinerary goes according to plan—which is subject to the unpredictable Antarctic weather—they will catch Richard M. Jones, a high school physics teacher from Billings, Mont., at the end of his stint and arrive a day or two ahead of Kevin A. Lavigne, a high school chemistry and biology teacher from Hanover, N.H.

During its stay, the Education Week team plans to file updates on the teachers’ experiences in Web-exclusive stories and photographs, and prepare an extended On Assignment feature story slated to run in later this winter.

For the final installment, set for spring publication, Education Week will follow up with the educators to describe how their participation in the NSF program has influenced their work in the classroom.

A version of this article appeared in the December 13, 2000 edition of Education Week as About This Series

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Student Well-Being Webinar
Equity, Care and Connection: New SEL Tools and Practices to Support Students and Adults
As school districts plan to welcome students back into buildings for the upcoming school year, this is the perfect time to take a hard look at both our practices and our systems to build a
Content provided by Panorama Education
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Classroom Technology Webinar
Here to Stay – Pandemic Lessons for EdTech in Future Development
What technology is needed in a post pandemic district? Learn how changes in education will impact development of new technologies.
Content provided by AWS
School & District Management Live Online Discussion A Seat at the Table: Strategies & Tips for Complex Decision-Making
Schools are working through the most disruptive period in the history of modern education, facing a pandemic, economic problems, social justice issues, and rapid technological change all at once. But even after the pandemic ends,

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Curriculum Whitepaper
6 Insights for Educators on Using Databases
Discover how teachers are effectively using databases with insights from educators who use Gale In Context: For Educators to collect, org...
Content provided by Gale
Curriculum Opinion Introducing Primary Sources to Students
Five educators share strategies for introducing primary sources to students, including English-language learners.
12 min read
Images shows colorful speech bubbles that say "Q," "&," and "A."
iStock/Getty
Curriculum Opinion Eight Ways to Teach With Primary Sources
Four educators share ways they use primary sources with students, including a strategy called "Zoom."
13 min read
Images shows colorful speech bubbles that say "Q," "&," and "A."
iStock/Getty
Curriculum The Dr. Seuss Controversy: What Educators Need to Know
The business that manages Dr. Seuss' work and legacy will cease publishing six books due to racist stereotypes and offensive content.
5 min read
A copy of the book "And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street," by Dr. Seuss, rests in a chair on March 1, 2021, in Walpole, Mass. Dr. Seuss Enterprises, the business that preserves and protects the author and illustrator's legacy, announced on his birthday, Tuesday, March 2, 2021, that it would cease publication of several children's titles including "And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street" and "If I Ran the Zoo," because of insensitive and racist imagery.
Dr. Seuss Enterprises announced it would cease publication of several of the author's children's titles because of insensitive and racist imagery.
Steven Senne/AP