States Interactive

Where Teachers Are Required to Get Vaccinated Against COVID-19

August 27, 2021 | Updated: October 15, 2021 1 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

This page will be updated when new information becomes available.

High teacher vaccination rates are widely considered by public health experts to be a key component of keeping schools safely open for in-person instruction. State policymakers, buoyed by the fact the Pfizer-BioNtech COVID-19 vaccine now has full FDA approval, are considering whether to mandate that teachers get the shot.

As of Sept. 28, two states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico have ordered all teachers to get vaccinated. Another eight states have said teachers must get vaccinated or undergo regular testing.

Federal and many state officials prioritized teachers in the vaccination process last winter as part of their strategy to return kids to school buildings. The vaccines protect those who receive them from serious illness or death from COVID-19 and also lower the likelihood of transmission to those around them. Since children younger than 12 are still ineligible for the vaccine, it’s especially important for their teachers and other adults in the school building to be vaccinated, epidemiologists say.

On Sept. 9, President Joe Biden urged governors to adopt teacher vaccine requirements and created a route to set those requirements in some states where governors have not implemented their own mandates. Nationally, 87 percent of teachers have been vaccinated against COVID-19, according to a nationally representative survey by the EdWeek Research Center.

Many states have so far left the decision on whether to require staff vaccinations to individual school districts. (See which of the large school districts have issued requirements.) And some state officials are still trying to determine the legalities of mandates for the COVID-19 shot. At least 10 states have prohibited school districts from requiring teachers to be vaccinated against COVID-19.

Data compilation and reporting: Madeline Will
Data visualization by Emma Patti Harris
For media or research inquiries about this data, contact library@educationweek.org.
How to cite this page: Where Teachers Are Required to Get Vaccinated Against COVID-19 (2021, August 27). Education Week. Retrieved Month Day, Year from https://www.edweek.org/policy-politics/where-teachers-are-required-to-get-vaccinated-against-covid-19/2021/08

Events

English-Language Learners Webinar Helping English-Learners Through Improved Parent Outreach: Strategies That Work
Communicating with families is key to helping students thrive – and that’s become even more apparent during a pandemic that’s upended student well-being and forced constant logistical changes in schools. Educators should pay particular attention
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Mathematics Webinar
Addressing Unfinished Learning in Math: Providing Tutoring at Scale
Most states as well as the federal government have landed on tutoring as a key strategy to address unfinished learning from the pandemic. Take math, for example. Studies have found that students lost more ground
Content provided by Yup Math Tutoring
Classroom Technology Webinar Building Better Blended Learning in K-12 Schools
The pandemic and the increasing use of technology in K-12 education it prompted has added renewed energy to the blended learning movement as most students are now learning in school buildings (and will likely continue

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

States How a Website to Complain About Teachers Is Fueling the Critical Race Theory Fight
It was pitched as an effort to strengthen anti-discrimination laws, but critics say it aims to reject any discussion of systemic racism.
2 min read
Frank Edelblut speaks at the Statehouse in Concord, N.H. on Jan. 31, 2017, during a public hearing on his nomination to lead the state's education department. As first-term Gov. Chris Sununu builds out his cabinet of commissioners, he's tapped some appointees with little to no professional experience in the departments they're tasked with leading. For education, he tapped Edelblut, a businessman who homeschooled his children.
Frank Edelblut speaks at the Statehouse in Concord, N.H. on Jan. 31, 2017, during a public hearing on his nomination to lead the state's education department. As first-term Gov. Chris Sununu builds out his cabinet of commissioners, he's tapped some appointees with little to no professional experience in the departments they're tasked with leading. For education, he tapped Edelblut, a businessman who homeschooled his children.
Elise Amendola/AP Photo
States Opinion 5 Takeaways for Education From Virginia's Governor Race
In an election where K-12 schooling was widely seen as the central issue, Glenn Youngkin’s victory has important implications for schools.
5 min read
Image shows a multi-tailed arrow hitting the bullseye of a target.
DigitalVision Vectors/Getty
States Anxiety Over Schools Fired Up Voters This Year. What About 2022?
Election results from Virginia, New Jersey, and elsewhere suggest educators and schools will be firmly in the spotlight next year.
10 min read
Virginia Gov.-elect Glenn Youngkin holds a broom as he greets supporters at an election night party in Chantilly, Va., early Wednesday, Nov. 3, 2021, after he defeated Democrat Terry McAuliffe.
Virginia Gov.-elect Glenn Youngkin, a Republican, holds a broom as he greets supporters at an election night party in Chantilly, Va., after he defeated Democratic challenger Terry McAuliffe.
Andrew Harnik/AP
States How One Governor's Race Has Channeled National and Local Anger Over Schools
Virginia's gubernatorial candidates are fighting over everything from parents' roles to banning books. Is this a preview of 2022 elections?
8 min read
Virginia Republican gubernatorial candidate Glenn Youngkin, left, gestures a he talks with supporters during a rally in Culpeper, Va., Wednesday, Oct. 13, 2021. Youngkin faces former Gov. Terry McAuliffe in the November election.
Virginia Republican gubernatorial candidate Glenn Youngkin, left, talks with supporters during a rally in Culpeper, Va. Youngkin faces former Gov. Terry McAuliffe in the November election.
Steve Helber/AP