States State of the States

New York

By Michele McNeil — January 15, 2008 1 min read
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Gov. Eliot Spitzer (D) • Jan. 9

Following last year’s major boost in funding and move to increase K-12 public schools’ accountability, Gov. Spitzer says he’s making higher education the priority this year. In his State of the State address, he proposed a $4 billion higher education endowment—possibly paid for by a plan to lease the state lottery—to pay for 2,000 new, full-time faculty members, 250 new “eminent scholars,” and expansion of the community college system. He also called for an “Innovation Fund,” similar to the National Science Foundation, to finance academic research.

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A version of this article appeared in the January 16, 2008 edition of Education Week

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