New York

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Teaching Profession Opinion What Does It Mean to 'Overspend' on Teacher Salaries?
Is it really possible for a district to spend too much money on teachers? Higher pay sows benefits beyond teachers' earnings.
Larry Ferlazzo, July 25, 2022
3 min read
An electric vehicle charging station pictured in New Rochelle, New York on June 5, 2022.
An electric vehicle charging station pictured in New Rochelle, N.Y. An upstate school district hopes that its investment in EV charging stations will appeal to new and existing staff members.
AP
Recruitment & Retention One School District's Unusual Recruitment Tactic
Can a rural district in New York entice staff with a commuting perk?
Mark Lieberman, June 29, 2022
4 min read
Image of buses lined up with stop signs extended out.
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Equity & Diversity Study Links Longer School Bus Rides to Chronic Absenteeism
Chronic absenteeism rates are as high as 12 percent for students with long bus rides, researchers find.
Williamena Kwapo, June 16, 2022
2 min read
People view the Supreme Court building from behind security fencing on Capitol Hill in Washington on March 21, 2021. A Supreme Court case being argued this week amid March Madness could erode the difference between elite college athletes and professional sports stars.
People view the U.S. Supreme Court building from behind security fencing on Capitol Hill.
Patrick Semansky/AP
Law & Courts As Nation Reels From School Shooting, Supreme Court to Rule on Wider Right to Carry Guns
The justices are weighing a major Second Amendment case in which they heard from groups reminding them of the tally of mass school attacks.
Mark Walsh, May 29, 2022
6 min read
A rifle hangs on display in the window of the West Endicott & Susquehanna Arms Co., Monday, May 16, 2022, where the Buffalo shooting suspect purchased fire arms in Endicott, N.Y.
A rifle hangs on display in the window of an Endicott, N.Y., gun shop where the Buffalo shooting suspect purchased firearms.
Michael Hill/AP
School Climate & Safety Responding to Student Threats: Schools Wrestle With How to Prevent Violence
The deadly shootings in Uvalde, Texas, and Buffalo, N.Y., spotlight the complexity of flagging and responding to potential warning signs.
Evie Blad, May 18, 2022
11 min read
Phlebotomists Willie Grant, left, and Tawana Liggins, right, prepare sophomore Isaac Brown and junior Kendra Gillenwater to donate blood during a blood drive at Eastbrook High School east of Marion, Ind., on Tuesday, Oct. 10, 2017.
Phlebotomists Willie Grant, left, and Tawana Liggins, right, prepare sophomore Isaac Brown and junior Kendra Gillenwater to donate blood during a blood drive at Eastbrook High School east of Marion, Ind., on Tuesday, Oct. 10, 2017.
Jeff Morehead/The Chronicle-Tribune via AP
Families & the Community N.Y.C. Schools Restarting Critically Needed Blood Donation Drives Stalled by COVID
Teens and educators are scrambling to bring school-based blood drives back to pre-pandemic levels.
Michael Elsen-Rooney, New York Daily News, May 2, 2022
3 min read
Gloved hand reaching into a laptop screen hacking someone's account.
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Privacy & Security What Schools Can Learn From the Biggest Cyberattack Ever on a Single District
Hackers infiltrated a New York City school district vendor, jeopardizing personal information for 820,000 current and former students.
Alyson Klein, March 30, 2022
2 min read
Image of a teacher in front of a classroom.
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Equity & Diversity Want to Reduce Suspensions for Students of Color? Look to Teachers of Color
Black and Hispanic students are less likely to be suspended when they have a teacher of the same race, new research confirms.
Madeline Will, March 2, 2022
6 min read
Students wearing masks leave the New Explorations into Science, Technology and Math (NEST+m) school in the Lower East Side neighborhood of Manhattan, Dec. 21, 2021, in New York.
Students wearing masks leave the New Explorations into Science, Technology and Math (NEST+m) School in the Lower East Side neighborhood of Manhattan, late last year in New York.
Brittainy Newman/AP
States States Are Dropping School Mask Requirements. Here's the Latest and What's Ahead
By the end of this week, only five states and the District of Columbia will still mandate universal masking in schools.
Stacey Decker & Holly Peele, February 28, 2022
2 min read
Visiting educators tour Hope House in 2016, the shelter and foster home for homeless students that Tiffany Anderson opened as superintendent of the Jennings School District in Missouri. Anderson, now the superintendent of Topeka Public Schools in Kansas, said that educators from around the country reached out about her work in Jennings after she was profiled as a Leader to Learn From in 2015.
Visiting educators tour a shelter and foster home for homeless students that Tiffany Anderson opened while superintendent of the Jennings district in Missouri. Anderson, now the superintendent in Topeka, Kan., said that educators from around the country wanted to learn about her work after she was profiled as a Leader To Learn From in 2015.
Courtesy of Tiffany Anderson
Professional Development 'Ambassadors of Hope': Why Past Leaders Lean on Their Fellow Honorees
Former Leaders To Learn From say they've relied on their fellow honorees for inspiration, support, and new insights during the pandemic.
Sarah Schwartz, February 16, 2022
7 min read
Melissa Jacobs, the director of library services for the New York City school system, takes a breather at the Murry Bergtraum High School Campus Library.
Melissa Jacobs, the director of library services for the New York City school district, at the Murry Bergtraum High School Campus Library.
Michael Kirby Smith for Education Week
School & District Management Leader To Learn From Reinventing the School Librarian's Role: How a NYC Library Director Adapted to Change
When schools moved online at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, librarians had to learn quickly new ways to support teachers and students.
Sarah D. Sparks, February 16, 2022
7 min read
New York's Mayor Michael Bloomberg, second from left, and Schools Chancellor Dennis Walcott, far left, meeting with senior students at the Bedford Academy High School in New York on Dec. 3, 2013. Bloomberg campaigned on gaining control of the nation's largest public school system. left his mark by championing charter schools, expanding school choice, giving schools letter grades, and replacing scores of struggling institutions with clusters of small schools.
Then-New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, second from left, and former Schools Chancellor Dennis Walcott, far left, meet with senior students at Bedford Academy High School in New York in 2013.
Bebeto Matthews/AP
School Choice & Charters Bloomberg Launches $750 Million Fund to Grow Charter Schools Amid 'Broken' K-12 System
Former New York City mayor and one-time presidential hopeful Michael R. Bloomberg aims to add 150,000 charter school seats over five years.
Andrew Ujifusa, December 1, 2021
5 min read
Parkland survivor and activist David Hogg speaks during a rally outside of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, Wednesday, Nov. 3, 2021. The Supreme Court is set to hear arguments in a gun rights case that centers on New York's restrictive gun permit law and whether limits the state has placed on carrying a gun in public violate the Second Amendment.
David Hogg, a survivor of the 2018 mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., speaks during a rally outside of the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday. The court heard arguments on a New York law that limits the concealed carry of guns for self-defense.
Jose Luis Magana/AP
Law & Courts Why Schools Have a Stake in U.S. Supreme Court Case That May Expand Gun Rights
In a case from New York state, the justices may further define the "sensitive places" such as schools where all firearms may be prohibited.
Mark Walsh, November 3, 2021
7 min read
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Collage by Laura Baker/Education Week and iStock/Getty
Education Funding State K-12 Spending Is Inequitable and Inadequate. See Where Yours Ranks
There's a $17,000 per student difference between the highest- and lowest-spending states. High-poverty schools suffer especially.
Mark Lieberman, October 28, 2021
4 min read