States

N.C. Adjusts Student Information System to Protect Transgender Students

By T. Keung Hui, The News & Observer (Raleigh, N.C.) — February 25, 2022 4 min read
Conceptual picture of transgender flag overlaying shadows and silhouettes of anonymous people on a road.
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

A recent change designed to protect the privacy of North Carolina’s transgender public school students is drawing complaints from some conservative groups.

At the end of January, the state Department of Public Instruction updated the PowerSchool information system so that the sex for students is no longer visible unless schools give users permission to view the records. The change, which DPI says is based on federal guidance, is meant to protect transgender students from being outed if the gender they identify with is not the same as their biological gender.

“The update does not erase student sex information in the system,” Blair Rhoades, a DPI spokeswoman, said in an email. “The update instead allows for local decision makers to choose who can view that information.

See Also

Illustration showing 4 individuals next to their pronouns (he/him, they/them, and she/her)
iStock/Getty Images Plus

“All states have been working towards following this federal guidance, as there has been ongoing litigation around Title IX, and the agency is obligated to comply with all federal laws addressing discrimination.”

Title IX is a civil rights law that prohibits gender-related discrimination in programs that receive federal funding.

But Education First Alliance is accusing Republican State Superintendent Catherine Truitt of “advancing the ‘Trans’ agenda.” The group cites the new change as well as one DPI made last year to PowerSchool to show the preferred name of students instead of just their legal names.

The group has taken positions such as advocating the removal of school face mask mandates and opposing what it calls the teaching of Critical Race Theory in schools.. It’s accused some Republican elected officials of not being conservative enough.

Education First Alliance charges that the PowerSchool changes “will allow children to choose their own names and sexes without the input or permission of parents.”

But Rhoades tweeted Tuesday that the assertion that DPI is allowing children to change genders without parental consent “is ludicrous & wholly inaccurate.”

Transgender students being outed

Craig White, supportive schools coordinator at the Asheville-based Campaign for Southern Equality, said at the start of the school year that the group received a rash of complaints about transgender students being outed at school. White said the problem was that everyone had PowerSchool access to the sex field for students.

White said that the group complained to DPI that both federal privacy rights and Title IX rights of transgender students were being violated. He said the group cited federal guidance the Biden Administration had given about discrimination based on gender identity.

In June 2020, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in the Bostock v. Clayton County case that federal employment discrimination law applies to transgender people. Based on the court ruling, the Biden Administration issued federal guidance saying Title IX’s prohibition of sexual discrimination includes discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity.

See Also

Demonstrators gather on the step of the Montana State Capitol on March 15, 2021 protesting anti-LGBTQ+ legislation in Helena, Mont. The Montana Senate Judiciary Committee voted March 18 to advance two bills targeting transgender youth despite overwhelming testimony opposing the measures. The measures would ban gender affirming surgeries for transgender minors and ban transgender athletes from participating in school and college sports. Both bills have already passed the Montana House. They head next to votes by the GOP-controlled Montana Senate.
Demonstrators gather on the steps of the Montana State Capitol in March to protest bills on transgender students' ability to play on single-sex sports teams.
Thom Bridge/Independent Record via AP

Based on the guidance, DPI sent an email on Jan. 23 to schools telling them an upcoming PowerSchool update would remove the student sex field from teachers’ screens.

A followup email on Jan. 26 told schools that the student sex field would be hidden in PowerSchool unless users had management access or were granted “view access” by their school.

“If a faculty member has a legitimate reason to see the sex of a student, they can,” White said in an interview Wednesday. “What they can’t do is receive it as a matter of course.”

‘Transgenderism in schools’

Tami Fitzgerald, executive director of the N.C. Values Coalition, said she blames the Biden Administration and not Superintendent Truitt or DPI for the change. She accused the Biden Administration of engaging in federal overreach by reinterpreting Title IX to include sexual orientation and gender identity.

“This goes back to the Biden agenda to elevate transgenderism in schools and to use schools as laboratory for experiments instead of looking at what’s best for children,” Fitzgerald said in an interview Wednesday.

Fitzgerald said principals should turn on the PowerSchool function to allow teachers to see the sex of their students because educators need to know that information.

The change comes at a time when Republican Lt. Gov. Mark Robinson has described teaching sexuality, including transgenderism and homosexuality, in schools as “filth.”

Robinson and other critics have called for removing some LGBTQ themed books from schools because they say they contain obscene and graphic depictions about sex.

White argues there’s a political war against LGBTQ students and faculty, especially transgender people.

“What we’re moving toward is an environment where students of color and LGBTQ students are not feeling safe and welcome in schools,” White said. “DPI is right that those students have the right to a quality public education.”

Copyright (c) 2022, The News & Observer (Raleigh, N.C.). Distributed by Tribune Content Agency.

Events

Special Education Webinar Reading, Dyslexia, and Equity: Best Practices for Addressing a Threefold Challenge
Learn about proven strategies for instruction and intervention that support students with dyslexia.
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Families & the Community Webinar
How Whole-Child Student Data Can Strengthen Family Connections
Learn how district leaders can use these actionable strategies to increase family engagement in their student’s education and boost their academic achievement.
Content provided by Panorama Education
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
College & Workforce Readiness Webinar
The School to Workforce Gap: How Are Schools Setting Students Up For Life & Lifestyle Success?
Hear from education and business leaders on how schools are preparing students for their leap into the workforce.
Content provided by Find Your Grind

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

States Educators Weigh K-12 Impact From an Unpredictable Election
Many of the most contentious issues in the 2022 midterms resonate most at the local level.
6 min read
"I Voted" stickers sit in a pile at the Fairview Recreation Center in North Minneapolis.
"I Voted" stickers sit in a pile at the Fairview Recreation Center in North Minneapolis during the midterm elections on Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2022.
Tim Evans/Minnesota Public Radio via AP
States K-12 and the Midterms: What to Watch For
Educators sound off on what the hard-fought midterm elections could mean for K-12 policy.
6 min read
Aidan Lau-Struck, 6, helps his mom Stephanie Lau feed her ballot into the machine at the Brighton Green Community Association voting precinct in North Chesterfield, Va., on Election Day, Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2022.
Aidan Lau-Struck, 6, helps his mother, Stephanie Lau, feed her ballot into the machine at the Brighton Green Community Association voting precinct in North Chesterfield, Va., on Election Day.
Eva Russo/Richmond Times-Dispatch via AP
States K-12 Insider or Conservative Advocate? Stark Choice in One State Superintendent's Race
A think tank CEO and a high school English teacher battle it out for South Carolina's top K-12 job.
8 min read
Ellen Weaver, the Republican nominee for South Carolina superintendent of education, speaks at U.S. Rep. Jeff Duncan's Faith & Freedom BBQ ahead of the keynote speaker, former Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, on Monday, Aug. 22, 2022, in Anderson, S.C.
Ellen Weaver, the Republican nominee for South Carolina superintendent of education, speaks at U.S. Rep. Jeff Duncan's Faith & Freedom BBQ in Anderson, S.C.
Meg Kinnard/AP
States School-Related Ballot Measures to Watch This Midterm Election
Voters in six states will decide on issues ranging from more funding for free school meals and the arts to reining in the state board.
7 min read
Image of ballots going into a box.
iStock/Getty