North Carolina

Voter registration application document with hand holding pen
Bill Oxford/Getty
Social Studies Most States Require Schools to Help Register Young Voters. Many Fail to Do It
Educators and advocates say schools don't have the resources needed to make registration laws as effective as they could be.
Sarah Schwartz, October 7, 2022
5 min read
Diverse group of students in a classroom working independently at desktop PCs and receiving assistance from Black female teacher.
JohnnyGreig/E+/Getty
Teacher Preparation HBCUs to Scale Up Teacher Residency Programs
Residency programs are considered a promising way to prepare more teachers of color. But they're expensive to run.
Madeline Will, October 7, 2022
7 min read
Sherri Miller is the principal of Lacy Elementary in Raleigh, N.C.
Sherri Miller is the principal of Lacy Elementary in Raleigh, N.C.
Kate Medley for Education Week
Reading & Literacy Listen: A Principal Reflects on Shifting to the 'Science of Reading'
Why is changing instructional practice so hard? 3 takeaways from EdWeek's Twitter Spaces discussion with a school leader.
Sarah Schwartz, September 16, 2022
3 min read
AR-15-style rifles are on display at Burbank Ammo & Guns in Burbank, Calif., June 23, 2022. Gun manufacturers have made more than $1 billion from selling AR-15-style guns over the past decade, and for two companies those revenues have tripled over the last three years, a House investigation unveiled Wednesday, July 27, found.
AR-15-style rifles are on display at gun store in Burbank, Calif. School safety experts say it's not unheard of for school districts to place such weapons in schools, but it requires serious consideration of the potential risks.
Jae C. Hong/AP
School Climate & Safety A Sheriff Is Putting AR-15s in Every School. What Safety Experts Have to Say
The Madison County, N.C., school district made headlines for placing assault rifles in SRO offices ahead of the new school year.
Libby Stanford, August 8, 2022
6 min read
First grader Makai Parker practices reading skills at Eastern Elementary School in Washington, N.C. The state of North Carolina is taking measures to improve reading rates in elementary schools, including this first grade classroom at Eastern Elementary in Washington, N.C.
First grader Makai Parker practices reading skills at Eastern Elementary School in Washington, N.C.
Kate Medley for Education Week
Reading & Literacy Project Second Time’s A Charm? A State Revamps Reading Instruction—Again
By prioritizing supports, North Carolina experts say its new “science of reading” law corrects flaws from a past effort.
Sarah Schwartz, July 20, 2022
10 min read
Staci Pollock teaches reading comprehension to her second grade class at Lacy Elementary in Raleigh, N.C., on May 25, 2022.
Read-alouds—like the one Staci Pollock is teaching in a 2nd grade class at Lacy Elementary in Raleigh, N.C.—introduce content knowledge and spur conversations among students who are still mastering reading fundamentals.
Kate Medley for Education Week
Reading & Literacy Project Why Putting the 'Science of Reading' Into Practice Is So Challenging
Philosophical disagreements, a rushed rollout, and a lack of ready-to-use materials have complicated one state's journey.
Sarah Schwartz, July 20, 2022
27 min read
Dena Keeling, a former equity officer for the Orange County (NC) School District, now works for the University of North Carolina, which partners with Durham Public Schools for equity work.
Dena Keeling, the former chief equity officer for the school district in Orange County, N.C., now works for the University of North Carolina, which partners with a different K-12 school system on issues of equity.
Kate Medley for Education Week
Equity & Diversity Backlash, Hostility, and Safety Fears: What It's Like to Be a Chief Equity Officer in the Anti-CRT Era
Three equity officers faced scrutiny, criticism, and personal threats, which intensified during the anti-critical race theory push.
Eesha Pendharkar, July 19, 2022
14 min read
NEA President Becky Pringle speaks on the second day of the 2021 NEA Convention in Denver.
National Education Association President Becky Pringle addresses the NEA representative assembly in 2021.
Moses Mitchell/National Education Association
Teaching Profession School Safety, Morale, and Filling Shortages: NEA President Dishes on What’s Next For Teachers
Becky Pringle takes EdWeek's questions about the union's safety policies, teacher shortages, and why it moved its conference out of Texas.
Madeline Will, July 6, 2022
8 min read
Scales of justice and Gavel on wooden table and Lawyer or Judge working with agreement in Courtroom, Justice and Law concept.
Pattanaphong Khuankaew/iStock
Law & Courts A Charter School Made Girls Wear Skirts to Promote 'Chivalry.' An Appeals Court Says No
A federal appeals court said the charter school's policy violates the Constitution and that Title IX applies to dress codes.
Mark Walsh, June 15, 2022
4 min read
Teaching Profession Video Here’s What’s Drawing Aspiring Teachers to the Field
Four student-teachers explain what’s drawing them to the field despite its steady stream of challenges.
Lauren Santucci & Madeline Will, June 14, 2022
3:11
Claire Engelhardt tutors students at Northeast High School in McLeansville, N.C., on Oct. 21, 2021.
Claire Engelhardt tutors students at Northeast High School in McLeansville, N.C., last October.
Courtesy of Guilford County Schools
Student Achievement With Millions of Kids on the Line, Can Schools Make Tutoring Work?
It should be a long-term investment in student learning, not a quick fix, experts say.
Catherine Gewertz, April 18, 2022
7 min read
Kara Klever holds a sign in protest in the hall outside of the Blue Room as Governor Kevin Stitt signs a bill into law that prevents transgender girls and women from competing on female sports teams at the Capitol Wednesday, March 30, 2022 in Oklahoma City, Oka. The bill, which easily passed the Republican-led House and Senate mostly along party lines, took effect immediately with the governor's signature. It applies to female sports teams in both high school and college.
Kara Klever holds a sign in protest as Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt signs a bill into law that prevents transgender girls and women from competing on female sports teams.
Doug Hoke/The Oklahoman via AP
States Beyond 'Don't Say Gay': Other States Seek to Limit LGBTQ Youth, Teaching
Legislators want to ban lessons on LGBTQ communities and require teachers to tell parents when students want their pronouns changed.
Stephen Sawchuk, April 6, 2022
9 min read
Illustration of numbered list.
Francis Sheehan/Education Week and Getty
IT Management How to Tackle Big Tech Problems in Schools: 3 Case Studies
See the strategies three districts are using to improve digital equity, upgrade cybersecurity, and solve staffing problems.
Kevin Bushweller, March 8, 2022
6 min read
Daniel Kelvin Bullock, Durham Public Schools Executive Director for Equity Affairs, and Jermaine Porter, Equity Leadership and Strategy Coordinator, talk over Zoom at the beginning of an online equity training course on Jan. 19, 2022. The Durham Public Schools Office of Equity Affairs provides the course which is co-hosted by Bullock, Porter and Iwinosa Idahor, Student Engagement and Opportunity Coordinator with the Durham Public Schools Office of Equity Affairs.
Daniel Kelvin Bullock, Durham Public Schools Executive Director for Equity Affairs, and Jermaine Porter, Equity Leadership and Strategy Coordinator, talk over Zoom at the beginning of an online equity training course on Jan. 19, 2022. The Durham Public Schools Office of Equity Affairs provides the course which is co-hosted by Bullock, Porter and Iwinosa Idahor, Student Engagement and Opportunity Coordinator with the Durham Public Schools Office of Equity Affairs.
Alex Boerner for Education Week
Equity & Diversity K-12 Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Trainings: Are They Divisive or Effective?
Education Week attended one district's training to see what it entails.
Ileana Najarro, March 4, 2022
13 min read