Leadership Symposium Early Bird Deadline Approaching | Join K-12 leaders nationwide for three days of empowering strategies, networking, and inspiration! Discounted pricing ends March 1. Register today.
Special Report
States

How the EPE Research Center Graded the States

March 21, 2008 3 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

For the Technology Leaders section of Technology Counts 2008, the EPE Research Center collected data on 14 indicators spanning three major areas of state technology policy and practice: access, use, and capacity. Data on access to technology were derived from a 2005-06 survey conducted by Market Data Retrieval and from background questionnaires administered as part of the 2007 National Assessment of Educational Progress in mathematics. Information on technology use and capacity was obtained from a survey of technology officials from state departments of education in the 50 states and the District of Columbia conducted by the EPE Research Center in the fall of 2007.

State Data Analysis
Tracking U.S. Trends

How the EPE Research Center Graded the States

Sources and Notes

About the EPE Research Center’s Annual State Technology Survey

Feature Stories
Executive Summary
Table of Contents

State information in each of these three categories was evaluated in order to determine an overall state grade for technology leadership. First, points were assigned to each column of data or information using the criteria described below. Then, point subtotals were generated for each of the three technology-leadership areas: access, use, and capacity. Finally, each state’s total score was calculated by taking the average of the scores for the three individual categories. Overall letter grades were assigned based on the following scale: 93 to 100 percent = A; 90 to 92 percent = A-minus; 87 to 89 percent = Bplus; 83 to 86 percent = B; 80 to 82 percent = B-minus; 77 to 79 percent = C-plus; 73 to 76 percent = C; 70 to 72 percent = C-minus; 67 to 69 percent = D-plus; 63 to 66 percent = D; 60 to 62 percent = D-minus; below 60 percent = F. Because of changes in two of the technologyaccess indicators, grades for 2008 are not comparable with those for the prior year. Here, in greater detail, is how we graded the states in the Technology Leaders section:

Technology Leaders

Weighting: Access to technology, use of technology, and capacity to use technology each account for one-third of the overall state grade.

Access to Technology: To calculate the access-to-technology subscore, the states were first ranked on each of four indicators. The specific indicators are as follows: percent of 4th grade students with access to computers; percent of 8th grade students with access to computers; students per instructional computer; and students per high-speed Internet-connected computer. The states were then divided into approximate quintiles. The top 10 states received an A for the column, the next 10 states received a B, the next 11 received a C, the next 10 a D, and the bottom 10 states an F. An A was awarded 100 points; a B, 85 points; a C, 75 points; a D, 65 points; and an F, 59 points. The scores for the four indicators were averaged and account for one-third of the overall grade.

Use of Technology: The use-of-technology subscore is based on four individual state-policy indicators. The specific policy measures are as follows: state standards for students include technology; state tests students on technology; state has established a virtual school; and state offers computer-based student assessments. States with a particular policy in place are indicated by a check mark in the table and received an A (100 points). Otherwise, the state received an F (59 points). The four resulting scores were averaged and represent one-third of the overall grade.

Capacity to Use Technology: The capacity-to-use-technology subscore is based on six individual state-policy indicators. The specific policy measures are as follows: state standards include technology for teachers; state standards include technology for administrators; state requires technology coursework or a test for initial teacher licensure; state requires technology coursework or a test for initial administrator licensure; state requires technology training or a technology test for recertification, or requires participation in technology-related professional development for teachers; and state requires technology training or a technology test for recertification, or requires participation in technology-related professional development for administrators. States with a particular policy in place are indicated by a check mark in the table and received an A (100 points). Otherwise, the state received an F (59 points). The six resulting scores were averaged and represent one-third of the overall grade.

Related Tags:

Events

Jobs Virtual Career Fair for Teachers and K-12 Staff
Find teaching jobs and other jobs in K-12 education at the EdWeek Top School Jobs virtual career fair.
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Reading & Literacy Webinar
Science of Reading: Emphasis on Language Comprehension
Dive into language comprehension through a breakdown of the Science of Reading with an interactive demonstration.
Content provided by Be GLAD
English-Language Learners Webinar English Learners and the Science of Reading: What Works in the Classroom
ELs & emergent bilinguals deserve the best reading instruction! The Reading League & NCEL join forces on best practices. Learn more in our webinar with both organizations.

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

States Q&A How Districts Can Navigate Tricky Questions Raised by Parents' Rights Laws
Where does a parent's authority stop and a school's authority begin? A constitutional law scholar weighs in.
6 min read
Illustration of dice with arrows and court/law building icons: conceptual idea of laws and authority.
Andrii Yalanskyi/iStock/Getty
States What 2024 Will Bring for K-12 Policy: 5 Issues to Watch
School choice, teacher pay, and AI will likely dominate education policy debates.
7 min read
The U.S. Capitol is seen in Washington, Monday, Feb. 6, 2023. President Joe Biden on Tuesday night will stand before a joint session of Congress for the first time since voters in the midterm elections handed control of the House to Republicans.
The rising role of artificial intelligence in education and other sectors will likely be a hot topic in 2024 at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, as well as in state legislatures across the country.
Mariam Zuhaib/AP
States How a Parents' Rights Law Halted a Child Abuse Prevention Program
State laws that have passed as part of the parents' rights movement have caused confusion and uncertainty over what schools can teach.
7 min read
People hold signs during a protest at the state house in Trenton, N.J., Monday, Jan. 13, 2020. New Jersey lawmakers are set to vote Monday on legislation to eliminate most religious exemptions for vaccines for schoolchildren, as opponents crowd the statehouse grounds with flags and banners, including some reading "My Child, My Choice."
People hold signs during a protest at the state house in Trenton, N.J., on Jan. 13, 2020, opposing legislation to eliminate most religious exemptions for vaccines for schoolchildren. In North Carolina, a bill passed to protect parents' rights in schools caused uncertainty that led two districts to pause a child sex abuse prevention program out of fear it would violate the new law.
Seth Wenig/AP
States More States Are Creating a 'Portrait of a Graduate.' Here's Why
A portrait of a graduate is a guiding document outlining a vision of what it means to be a successful student.
8 min read
Image of attributes of a graduate.
Parker Shatkin for Education Week with iStock/Getty