Student Well-Being

Web Site Offers Online Mentoring Connections

By Andrew L. Yarrow — November 10, 2010 1 min read
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We all know that mentors benefit students, but can mentoring be successful if it is not done in person?

In the digital age, one of the groups that believes in e-mentoring is icouldbe.org. Its online mentoring connects mentors and at-risk youth in low-income communities and focuses on college preparation for these teenagers. During the last few years, the organization says it has involved about 10,000 students in its online mentoring sessions.

Citing the nation’s high school dropout crisis, executive director Kate Schrauth said: “For things to improve, we must invest in our youth and reach them with the guidance, support and encouragement they need. Icouldbe.org is here to help, connecting caring adults directly to young people who often lack adults invested in their futures.”

Individuals can apply on the organization’s web site to become a mentor. After that, they log in on their computers and spend up to an hour with their mentees working through icouldbe’s discussion materials on the importance of high school completion and goal-setting, or simply answering students’ questions.

Sounds like a fairly undemanding way to help students from the comfort of your home and at your convenience.

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A version of this news article first appeared in the K-12, Parents & the Public blog.

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