Student Well-Being Video

Supporting Grieving Students: Advice From Parents and Counselors (Videos)

By Kaylee Domzalski — August 19, 2021 1 min read
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Throughout the pandemic, students have experienced a range of losses – from the loss of a parent or loved one, to the loss of financial stability in the home, to the loss of some of those quintessential moments and experiences of childhood. Educators are now tasked with identifying the many ways that grief can present in students, and then addressing those different emotions and challenges that arise in the classroom. In this four-part series, we hear from school counselors, a mother who helped her son through the grief of losing his father and sister and the founder of a camp for kids who have experienced loss. All provide actionable advice for educators heading back into the classroom for another school year impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.

How to Become Trauma–Informed

Addressing Students’ Grief and Anxiety

How Schools Can Support Grieving Kids

A Widowed Mother’s Advice for Teachers

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This series is sponsored by Committee for Children.
Coverage of whole-child approaches to learning is supported in part by a grant from the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative, at www.chanzuckerberg.com. Education Week retains sole editorial control over the content of this coverage.

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