School Climate & Safety Interactive

School Shootings in 2019: How Many and Where

February 06, 2019 | Updated: October 22, 2021 | Corrected: October 22, 2021 2 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

Corrected: A shooting during a high school football game at Ladd-Peebles Stadium in Mobile, Ala., on Aug. 30, 2019, has been removed from this tracker. The incident occurred on a property that is owned by the city of Mobile, not the school district.

To bring context to the polarizing debates that surround school shootings, Education Week journalists, in 2018, began tracking shootings on K-12 school property that resulted in firearm-related injuries or deaths. That year, there were 24 such incidents. We continued tracking school shootings in 2019, when there were also 24 such incidents. On this page, we document where they happened, how many people were killed or injured, and other key information.

Looking for the Latest Data?

We are continuing to track school shootings. Information about the most recent year’s school shootings is available here.

Behind the Numbers

To better understand how gun violence impacted students, educators, and communities in 2019, Education Week created an at-a-glance view of school shooting data. Read more.

Injuries & Deaths

Where the Shootings Happened

Size of the dots correlates to the number of victims. Click on each dot for more information.

About the Shootings

A previous version of this table included the status of the suspect. We are no longer tracking that information.

About This Tracker

In the emotionally charged aftermath of school shootings, politicians, activists, news media, and ordinary citizens often cite statistics that can present a distorted view of how many of these incidents occur. Those statistics are used to fuel ongoing debates about gun control, arming teachers, and school security.

With this tracker, Education Week looks to provide a clear accounting of K-12 school shootings. There is no single right way of calculating numbers like this, and the human toll in the immediate aftermath and long term are impossible to measure. We hope only to provide reliable information to help inform discussions, debates, and paths forward until such reports are deemed unnecessary.
This page refers to incidents:

  • where a firearm was discharged
  • where any individual, other than the suspect or perpetrator, has a bullet wound resulting from the incident
  • that happen on K-12 school property or on a school bus
  • that occur while school is in session or during a school-sponsored event

Injuries include those reported by police and news media. They may be major or minor. While we only track incidents resulting in at least one bullet wound, total injuries are not necessarily the result of gunfire. The total count of those killed or injured does not include the suspect or perpetrator.
We will not track incidents in which the only shots fired were from an individual authorized to carry a gun, such as a school resource officer, and who did so in their official capacity. The numbers of incidents and victims reported in this tracker do not include suicides or self-inflicted injuries. While suicides and attempted suicides are serious issues of health and safety, many of the critical questions and debates that those incidents raise for educators and the broader public are distinct from those generated by school shootings.

In addition to our own reporting, we rely on local news outlets, school and district websites, news alerts via online search engines, the Gun Violence Archive, and the Center for Homeland Defense and Security’s Naval Postgraduate School’s K-12 School Shooting database.

Reporting & Analysis: Lesli Maxwell, Evie Blad, Holly Peele, Denisa R. Superville | Design & Visualization: Stacey Decker, Hyon-Young Kim

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Mathematics Webinar
Addressing Unfinished Learning in Math: Providing Tutoring at Scale
Most states as well as the federal government have landed on tutoring as a key strategy to address unfinished learning from the pandemic. Take math, for example. Studies have found that students lost more ground
Content provided by Yup Math Tutoring
Classroom Technology Webinar Building Better Blended Learning in K-12 Schools
The pandemic and the increasing use of technology in K-12 education it prompted has added renewed energy to the blended learning movement as most students are now learning in school buildings (and will likely continue

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

School Climate & Safety Violence, Hate Crimes in Schools Surged in Pre-COVID Period, Federal Watchdog Finds
Data from several years preceding the pandemic sketched a troubling trajectory, the Government Accountability Office found.
7 min read
Hands of people point to a boy insinuating bullying.
iStock/Getty Images Plus
School Climate & Safety Transgender Students Need Adult Support in School. Is It Slipping?
Educators' support for transgender students and colleagues dropped since 2017, as anti-transgender bills mount in state legislatures.
6 min read
Conceptual picture of transgender flag overlaying shadows and silhouettes of anonymous people on a road.
iStock/Getty Images Plus
School Climate & Safety Explainer School Resource Officers (SROs), Explained
Does the presence of armed officers prevent school violence? Do they contribute for Black children to the 'school to prison pipeline'?
13 min read
Greeley Police Officer Steve Brown stands in the hallway during passing periods at Northridge High School in Greeley, Colo. on Oct. 21, 2016. While school resource officers, like Brown, are expected to handle responsibilities like any police officer they're faced with unique challenges working day-to-day in schools
Greeley Police Officer Steve Brown stands in the hallway during passing periods at Northridge High School in Greeley, Colo. While school resource officers, like Brown, are expected to handle responsibilities like any police officer, they're faced with unique challenges working day-to-day in schools.
Joshua Polson/The Greeley Tribune/AP
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
School Climate & Safety Quiz
How Much Do You Know About School Crime and Safety?
How much do you know about school crime and safety?
Content provided by Masonite