Opinion
Families & the Community Letter to the Editor

N.H. Curriculum Law Goes Too Far

February 21, 2012 1 min read

The writer is pursuing a Master of Arts in Teaching degree at Willamette University, in Salem, Ore.

This is in response to the blog post titled “Who Determines What is Taught?” (Walt Gardner’s Reality Check, Jan. 27, 2012). I think what we are seeing is the death of the public educational system, as it is no longer sustainable. The belief that a general education standard can be devised to fit the diverse ideological standards of the American people is an exercise in futility (insanity?).

All of these “disputes” originate out of the current school system’s inadvertent offending of some ideologue’s sensibilities. I thought that this was fairly apparent. Apparently, not to the geniuses in the New Hampshire state legislature who voted to give parents the right to object to any course material in their child’s curriculum, according to the blog. How could anyone hold the opinion that you can make all of the people happy all of the time?

I believe that this is the beginning of the climactic battle between the religious right, who detest the idea of their children being taught about homosexuality, and the radical left, who would have a child banished from school for praying over lunch or wearing a “Jesus Rocks” T-shirt. The blog went on to mention the Koch brothers, but fails to address scientific or sociological lobbyists that also seek to sway public opinion through education. And don’t get me started on the textbook companies!

I hate to say it, but I think that maybe it is just time to let the whole public education system go.

Jeremy Lockwood

Monmouth, Ore.

The writer is pursuing a Master of Arts in Teaching degree at Willamette University, in Salem, Ore.

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A version of this article appeared in the February 22, 2012 edition of Education Week as N.H. Curriculum Law Goes Too Far

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