School & District Management

New Skills Pushed for Md. Principals

By Jeff Archer — August 09, 2005 1 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

Principals in Maryland soon will have to know more than just how to keep their schools running smoothly, under new state licensing rules.

“Maryland Instructional Leadership Framework” is available from the Maryland State Department of Education. (Microsoft Word Required.)

Starting next summer, applicants for Maryland school administrator licenses must show that they were trained in a program that focuses on eight skills spelled out by the state that are aimed at the improvement of teaching and learning.

Approved by the state board of education last month, the rule is meant to prompt changes in Maryland universities that train school leaders, said Mary Cary, an assistant superintendent in the state department of education.

“What we find when we look at our programs for administrator preparation is that they have been in place for many years, and they have not placed instructional leadership as the driving force for their content,” she said.

Universities elsewhere are feeling similar pressure to retool the way they train principals. A recent report by Arthur E. Levine, the president of Teachers College, Columbia University, said the quality of most such programs ranges from “inadequate to appalling.” (“Study Blasts Leadership Preparation,” March 16, 2005)

In Maryland, the skills in which the state now says administrators must be trained include ensuring the proper use of performance data, frequent student assessments, and classroom observations to inform instructional decisions.

Each skill is described in a new document, the “Maryland Instructional Leadership Framework,” that department officials drafted in consultation with education leaders from across the state.

Already, the framework is shaping the work of the state’s education schools. Towson University, outside Baltimore, is planning a new, degree-offering department of instructional leadership and professional development.

Raymond Lorion, the dean of Towson’s school of education, said the state’s new expectations for principals provided much of the impetus for the effort. “An instructional leader’s real purpose is to help teachers find the right vehicle to get that child to acquire knowledge and skills,” he said.

Related Tags:

A version of this article appeared in the August 10, 2005 edition of Education Week

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
School & District Management Webinar
Leadership in Education: Building Collaborative Teams and Driving Innovation
Learn strategies to build strong teams, foster innovation, & drive student success.
Content provided by Follett Learning
School & District Management K-12 Essentials Forum Principals, Lead Stronger in the New School Year
Join this free virtual event for a deep dive on the skills and motivation you need to put your best foot forward in the new year.
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Privacy & Security Webinar
Navigating Modern Data Protection & Privacy in Education
Explore the modern landscape of data loss prevention in education and learn actionable strategies to protect sensitive data.
Content provided by  Symantec & Carahsoft

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

School & District Management How Principals Are Outsourcing Their Busywork to AI
Principals are chipping away at their administrative to-do lists with a little help from AI.
6 min read
Education technology and AI Artificial Intelligence concept, Women use laptops, Learn lessons and online webinars successfully in modern digital learning,  Courses to develop new skills
iStock/Getty
School & District Management Opinion How to Let Your Values Guide You as a School Leader
Has your “why” become fuzzy? Here are four steps to keep principals motivated and moving forward.
Damia C. Thomas
4 min read
Silhouette of a figure inside of which is reflected public school life, Self-reflection of career in education
Vanessa Solis/Education Week via Canva
School & District Management ‘Be Vocal Without Being Vicious’: Superintendents on Fighting for More Funding
Two superintendents talk about stepping into the political realm to call for more public school funding.
5 min read
Photo of dollar bills frozen in ice.
iStock / Getty Images Plus
School & District Management New Principals Have a Steep Learning Curve. Could Apprenticeships Help?
North Dakota's leaders share what they've learned about creating a principal apprenticeship in a playbook aimed at other states
5 min read
Photo of principals walking in school hallway.
E+/Getty