School & District Management

New Skills Pushed for Md. Principals

By Jeff Archer — August 09, 2005 1 min read

Principals in Maryland soon will have to know more than just how to keep their schools running smoothly, under new state licensing rules.

“Maryland Instructional Leadership Framework” is available from the Maryland State Department of Education. (Microsoft Word Required.)

Starting next summer, applicants for Maryland school administrator licenses must show that they were trained in a program that focuses on eight skills spelled out by the state that are aimed at the improvement of teaching and learning.

Approved by the state board of education last month, the rule is meant to prompt changes in Maryland universities that train school leaders, said Mary Cary, an assistant superintendent in the state department of education.

“What we find when we look at our programs for administrator preparation is that they have been in place for many years, and they have not placed instructional leadership as the driving force for their content,” she said.

Universities elsewhere are feeling similar pressure to retool the way they train principals. A recent report by Arthur E. Levine, the president of Teachers College, Columbia University, said the quality of most such programs ranges from “inadequate to appalling.” (“Study Blasts Leadership Preparation,” March 16, 2005)

In Maryland, the skills in which the state now says administrators must be trained include ensuring the proper use of performance data, frequent student assessments, and classroom observations to inform instructional decisions.

Each skill is described in a new document, the “Maryland Instructional Leadership Framework,” that department officials drafted in consultation with education leaders from across the state.

Already, the framework is shaping the work of the state’s education schools. Towson University, outside Baltimore, is planning a new, degree-offering department of instructional leadership and professional development.

Raymond Lorion, the dean of Towson’s school of education, said the state’s new expectations for principals provided much of the impetus for the effort. “An instructional leader’s real purpose is to help teachers find the right vehicle to get that child to acquire knowledge and skills,” he said.

Related Tags:

A version of this article appeared in the August 10, 2005 edition of Education Week

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Student Well-Being Webinar
Equity, Care and Connection: New SEL Tools and Practices to Support Students and Adults
As school districts plan to welcome students back into buildings for the upcoming school year, this is the perfect time to take a hard look at both our practices and our systems to build a
Content provided by Panorama Education
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Classroom Technology Webinar
Here to Stay – Pandemic Lessons for EdTech in Future Development
What technology is needed in a post pandemic district? Learn how changes in education will impact development of new technologies.
Content provided by AWS
School & District Management Live Online Discussion A Seat at the Table: Strategies & Tips for Complex Decision-Making
Schools are working through the most disruptive period in the history of modern education, facing a pandemic, economic problems, social justice issues, and rapid technological change all at once. But even after the pandemic ends,

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

School & District Management Principals and Stress: Strategies for Coping in Difficult Times
Running schools in the pandemic has strained leaders in unprecedented ways. Principals share their ideas for how to manage the stress.
6 min read
Illustration of calm woman working at desk
Getty
School & District Management Wanted: Superintendents to Lead Districts Through the End of a Pandemic
Former superintendents say there are signs when it's time to move on. Their replacements are more likely to be greenhorns, experts say.
4 min read
Los Angeles Unified School District Superintendent Austin Beutner speaks at a news conference at the school district headquarters in Los Angeles on March 13, 2020. Beutner will step down as superintendent after his contract ends in June, he announced Wednesday, April 21, 2021.
Austin Beutner, the superintendent of Los Angeles Unified, will step down after his contract ends in June.
Damian Dovarganes/AP
School & District Management Has COVID-19 Led to a Mass Exodus of Superintendents?
This year has been exhausting for superintendents. Some experts say they're seeing an unusually high number of resignations this spring.
5 min read
Chicago Public Schools Superintendent Janice K. Jackson, right, speaks on Feb. 11, 2021, during a news conference at the William H. Brown Elementary School in Chicago. In-person learning for students in pre-k and cluster programs began Thursday, since the district's agreement with the Chicago Teachers Union was reached.
Chicago Public Schools Superintendent Janice K. Jackson, right, announced earlier this week that she would depart the school system. Jackson, who assumed the superintendency in 2018, has worked for more than 20 years in CPS.
Shafkat Anowar
School & District Management Most Schools Offer at Least Some In-Person Classes, According to Feds' Latest Count
A majority of 4th and 8th graders had at least some in-person schooling by March, but inequities persisted.
3 min read
Image shows empty desks in a classroom.
Chris Ryan/OJO Images