Issues

October 12, 2022

Education Week, Vol. 42, Issue 9
Student teacher Olivia Vazquez, standing, left, speaks with a student at the Eliza B. Kirkbride School in Philadelphia, Wednesday, Oct. 20, 2021. Vazquez is finishing up her last semester at Swarthmore College and hoping to help make sure immigrant students arriving in Philadelphia have a more supportive experience in school than she did growing up.
Student-teacher Olivia Vazquez, left, speaks with a student at the Eliza B. Kirkbride School in Philadelphia on Oct. 20. Vazquez hopes to make sure immigrant students arriving in the city have a more supportive experience in school than she did growing up.
Matt Rourke/AP
Education Briefly Stated: October 12, 2022
October 11, 2022
8 min read
Image of data, target goals, and gaining ground.
iStock/Getty
Assessment Don’t Use State Tests ‘Punitively,’ Ed. Secretary Cardona Warns
Sarah Schwartz, September 23, 2022
5 min read
High school tutor giving male student one to one tutoring at a desk
iStock/Getty Images Plus
The Michigan City High School Girls Varsity Basketball team hosted a Future Wolves basketball camp for elementary and middle school girls on Saturday, March 5, 2022 at the high school.
The varsity girls basketball team at Michigan City High School in Michigan City, Ind., hosted a basketball camp for elementary and middle school girls last spring.
Kelley Smith/The News Dispatch via AP
A bald man and a woman with long brown hair tearfully hug a teen girl who is wearing a pale beighe backpack. Three women look on with concerned expressions.
A family shares a tearful reunion after Thomas Jefferson High School in San Antonio, Texas, went into lockdown because of a false report of a shooting.
Kin Man Hui/The San Antonio Express-News via AP
A male police officer in a dark blue uniform walks between two white police SUVs parked in front of a three-story, red brick school building.
A police officer patrolled Glennwood Elementary School in Decatur, Ga., while the school was on lockdown in 2018.
John Amis/AP
Amanda Jones, a librarian in Livingston Parish, La., pictured on Sept. 13, 2022. Jones is suing members of a Facebook group who harassed her virtually after she spoke against censorship in a public library meeting. Jones received angry emails and even a death threat from people across the country after she filed the lawsuit.
Amanda Jones, a librarian in Livingston Parish, La., is suing members of a Facebook group who harassed her virtually after she spoke against censorship in a public library meeting.
Claire Bangser for Education Week
Illustration of laptop with checklist on the screen
In interviews with Education Week, educators described what features their ideal learning management system would have.
DigitalVision Vectors/Getty
Illustration of voting.
DigitalVision Vectors
States Election Guide 2022: Results on the Issues and Races Affecting K-12
Libby Stanford, September 27, 2022
14 min read
Outgoing Arizona schools chief Tom Horne asserts that a major school district in Tucson is violating a new state law by continuing an ethnic studies program designed primarily for Hispanics, pointing out a quotation from a textbook used in the class, at a news conference in Phoenix on Jan. 3, 2011. A federal judge in Tucson, in a finding made public Tuesday, Aug. 22, 2017, ruled that an ethnic studies ban in Arizona that shuttered a popular Mexican-American program was enacted with racial discrimination. The 2010 law dismantled the Tucson Unified School District program, launching months of protests by students and parents who said it enriched school performance.
Tom Horne, the Republican nominee for the Arizona schools superintendent position, says he would put an end to critical race theory and "indoctrination" if elected.
Ross D. Franklin/AP
States Divisions on Race, Gender Intensify a Fight for State Superintendent
Libby Stanford, September 30, 2022
9 min read
With only open windows and fans to cool the room down, students enter their non-air-conditioned classroom at Campbell High School in Ewa, Hawaii, on Aug. 3, 2015. Most of Hawaii's public schools don't have air conditioning, and record-high temperatures have left teachers and students saying they can't focus because of the heat. Hawaii lawmakers are saying it's time to cool Hawaii's public schools. A proposal being considered by the House Committee of Finance would fund air conditioning for Hawaii Department of Education schools and expedite the process to get cooling systems installed in classrooms.
Only open windows and fans cooled the room as students arrived at Campbell High School in Ewa, Hawaii, in August, 2015. Most of Hawaii's public schools don't have air conditioning, even as research shows that heat can depress student learning.
Marco Garcia/AP
Conceptual illustration of a garden growing from adversity
DigitalVision Vectors/Getty
Student Well-Being Opinion ‘The Timing Is Critical’: How Schools Can Help Refugee Students
Jeffrey P. Winer & Luna A. Mulder, September 30, 2022
5 min read
illustration of a person being prevented from leaving by a large magnet's pull.
Nuthawut Somsuk/iStock/Getty
Budget & Finance Opinion 6 Ways to Solve the Teacher Shortage With Federal Stimulus Money
Erin Covington, September 28, 2022
4 min read
Illustration of an open laptop receiving an email.
iStock/Getty
Families & the Community Letter to the Editor Use Families to Help With Learning Recovery
October 11, 2022
1 min read
Illustration of an open laptop receiving an email.
iStock/Getty
School & District Management Letter to the Editor Let’s Reimagine the Purpose of School
October 11, 2022
1 min read
conceptual image of people coming together to form a lightbulb
DigitalVision Vectors/Getty
School & District Management Opinion 3 Shifts That Will Benefit Every New Ed. Leader
Jennifer Perry Cheatham, Rodney Thomas & Adam Parrott-Sheffer, September 23, 2022
4 min read