School Climate & Safety Video

Webinar: Monitoring and Improving School Climate With Student Surveys

October 17, 2017 1:00:01

Monitoring facets of school climate—like how safe, supported, and welcome students feel in their schools—is necessary to ensure that efforts to improve the learning environment are effective and that schools don’t overlook the needs of students from some populations, like those from racial minority groups, researchers say. But, until recently, school climate surveys have been off limits to schools that didn’t have the resources to pay for one or develop their own. Earlier this year, the U.S. Department of Education released a free, online survey tool that will allow schools, districts, and states to administer regular, anonymous, online student surveys about school climate topics. The survey site, developed by a panel of researchers, creates an instant analysis of a school’s results, and administrators can save the data in existing local data systems so they can track results over time. These results could be useful for school-level improvement work. They may also be helpful for schools in states that adopt school climate as an accountability indicator under the Every Student Succeeds Act. In addition to learning about the new tool, webinar participants will hear from the Austin Independent School District about its school climate surveys, how their results align with student achievement, and how schools there use the data in their day-to-day work.

Related Tags:

Coverage of social and emotional learning is supported in part by a grant from the NoVo Foundation. Education Week retains sole editorial control over the content of this coverage.

Video

Ed-Tech Policy Video Los Angeles Unified Is Banning Cellphones: A Board Member Explains Why and How
The LAUSD board member behind the district's new cell phone ban explains the motivation, and how it'll work.
An 11-year-old boy plays with his father's phone outside school in Barcelona, Spain, on June 17, 2024. Parents across Europe are rallying to make it normal for young kids to live smartphone-free. From Spain to Ireland and the UK, groups are ballooning on chat groups like WhatsApp and agreeing to link arms and refuse to buy children younger than 12 smartphones.
An 11-year-old boy plays with his father's phone outside school in Barcelona, Spain, on June 17, 2024. Parents across Europe are rallying to make it normal for young kids to live smartphone-free. From Spain to Ireland and the UK, groups are ballooning on chat groups like WhatsApp and agreeing to link arms and refuse to buy children younger than 12 smartphones.
Emilio Morenatti/AP
School & District Management Video 'Students Never Forget': Principals Call for Help After School Shootings
School leaders are lobbying Congress for more financial support for schools that experience gun violence.
2 min read
Forest High School students console one another after a school shooting at Forest High School Friday, April 20, 2018 in Ocala, Fla. One student shot another in the ankle at the high school and a suspect is in custody, authorities said Friday. The injured student was taken to a local hospital for treatment.
Forest High School students console one another after a school shooting at Forest High School Friday, April 20, 2018 in Ocala, Fla. One student shot another in the ankle at the high school and a suspect is in custody, authorities said Friday. The injured student was taken to a local hospital for treatment.
Doug Engle/Star-Banner via AP
Special Education Video Students With Disabilities 'Have Gotten Their Dignity Back' at This High School
A state partnership involving 16 schools aims to ensure that students with disabilities spend more of their time in mainstream classrooms.
3 min read
English-Language Learners Video How Teachers Can Prepare English Learners for the WIDA Test (VIDEO)
Education Week reporter Ileana Najarro tests herself, and offers insights for teachers, on the WIDA test for English learners.
A sample question from the WIDA test.
A sample question from the WIDA test.