Data News in Brief

USDA Bars Lunch-Data Use In Student-Assignment Plan

By McClatchy-Tribune — March 08, 2011 1 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

Subsidized-lunch data are confidential and cannot be used to determine which schools students attend, the U.S. Department of Agriculture has warned the Wake County, N.C., school district.

That revelation could dim hopes for those who want the 143,000-student district to return to a previous student-assignment policy that relied on socioeconomic factors to balance enrollment. (“Cooling Signs in Wake Debate,” Feb. 23, 2011.) Wake County had used data on students who get free and reduced-price lunches for more than a decade to develop student-assignment plans.

The opinion from the Agriculture Department could have national repercussions. When the U.S. Supreme Court restricted the use of race in student assignment in 2007, justices left open the use of socioeconomic diversity. The U.S. Department of Justice had cited Wake County’s former approach as a role model.

Related Tags:

A version of this article appeared in the March 09, 2011 edition of Education Week as USDA Bars Lunch-Data Use in Student-Assignment Plan

Events

Classroom Technology K-12 Essentials Forum Making Technology Work Better in Schools
Join experts for a look at the steps schools are taking (or should take) to improve the use of technology in schools.
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Budget & Finance Webinar
The ABCs of ESSER: How to Make the Most of Relief Funds Before They Expire
Join a diverse group of K-12 experts to learn how to leverage federal funds before they expire and improve student learning environments.
Content provided by Johnson Controls
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
School & District Management Webinar
Modernizing Principal Support: The Road to More Connected and Effective Leaders
When principals are better equipped to lead, support, and maintain high levels of teaching and learning, outcomes for students are improved.
Content provided by BetterLesson

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Data Opinion How to Start Using Data to Achieve Equity for Students
Schools are awash with data but rarely do anything with it. One district started out by limiting the tools it uses.
Mackey Pendergrast & Erica Hartman
5 min read
Entry Point
Shutterstock
Data Education Department to Expand Data Collection on COVID and Schools
The Education Department will expand the limited survey started last year to query about issues like learning loss and health precautions.
2 min read
Image of a data dashboard.
Suppachok Nuthep/iStock/Getty
Data 'Extreme' Chronic Absenteeism? Pandemic School Attendance Data Is Bleak, But Incomplete
Only a handful of states have reported information on chronic absenteeism, right as advocates warn that addressing it will be a top priority this fall.
4 min read
Image of an empty desk.
Laura Baker/Education Week and kazuma seki/iStock/Getty
Data Knowing What Schools Did in the Pandemic is Crucial. So Is Preserving That Data
A prominent researcher is working to collect information on schools and COVID-19 to inform future study on the pandemic's effects.
6 min read
Kindergarten students wear masks and are separated by plexiglass during class at Milton Elementary School, in Rye, N.Y. on May 18, 2021.
Kindergarten students wear masks and are separated by plexiglass during class in May at Milton Elementary School, in Rye, N.Y.
Mary Altaffer/AP