Ed-Tech Policy Report Roundup

Technology Spending Correlated With AYP

By Jessica L. Tonn — September 27, 2005 1 min read

Information on ordering the “2005-2006 National Technology Assessment” is available from Quality Education Data Inc.

School districts that met the requirements for adequate yearly progress under the No Child Left Behind Act during the 2004-05 school year spent more on technology than school districts that did not meet the requirements, a survey has found.

According to the survey of more than 7,400 school systems, which was conducted by Denver-based Quality Education Data Inc., a subsidiary of New York City-based Scholastic Inc., districts that met the AYP requirements spent an average of $147 per student on technology during the 2004-05 school year, and districts in which at least one school did not meet the AYP requirements spent $120. However, the survey did not take into account the socioeconomic status of the districts.

A version of this article appeared in the September 28, 2005 edition of Education Week

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