Classroom Technology

Students Want to Learn More About AI. Schools Aren’t Keeping Up

By Lauraine Langreo — November 10, 2023 1 min read
Illustration of an AI chatbot assist on the face of a cellphone tutoring a kid student doing homework with subject matter icons floating all around him.
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

There’s a wide gap between what students say they want to learn about how to use artificial intelligence responsibly and what schools are teaching them right now, concludes a recent report from the Center for Democracy & Technology, a nonprofit that promotes digital rights.

Seventy-two percent of students said they would find it helpful to learn how to use generative AI responsibly, according to the organization’s nationally representative survey of 1,029 high school students conducted between June and August. Meanwhile, less than half of students (44 percent) said they’ve received AI guidance from their schools, the report found.

Today’s students are often called digital natives and seen as experts in navigating the digital space. But the report found other gaps in the digital-technology guidance that students said would be helpful to get from their schools and what schools have provided so far.

As schools become more reliant on technology for teaching and learning, collecting student data, and monitoring students’ behavior online, it’s important to teach students how to be responsible digital citizens.

In the Center for Democracy & Technology survey conducted over the summer, students were asked what kind of tech guidance and support from schools they would find helpful. Here’s what they said:

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Curriculum Webinar
Strategies for Incorporating SEL into Curriculum
Empower students to thrive. Learn how to integrate powerful social-emotional learning (SEL) strategies into the classroom.
Content provided by Be GLAD
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
School & District Management Webinar
Leadership in Education: Building Collaborative Teams and Driving Innovation
Learn strategies to build strong teams, foster innovation, & drive student success.
Content provided by Follett Learning
School & District Management K-12 Essentials Forum Principals, Lead Stronger in the New School Year
Join this free virtual event for a deep dive on the skills and motivation you need to put your best foot forward in the new year.

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Classroom Technology Opinion Cellphones in Schools: Addiction, Distraction, or Teaching Tool?
A short history of the long debate over how to manage cellphone use in the classroom.
5 min read
People staring into their phones. Conceptual Illustration.
Vanessa Solis/Education Week + Getty Images
Classroom Technology AI and Equity, Explained: A Guide for K-12 Schools
Educators need to be aware that AI technology is only as good as the data it’s been trained on. That data often reflects society's biases.
12 min read
Artificial intelligence and schoolwork image with hand holding pencil with digital AI collage overtop
iStock/Getty
Classroom Technology Which Teachers Are More Likely to Use AI Chatbots?
A growing number of teachers are using AI-powered chatbots for work, but there’s a gap opening up among younger and older teachers.
3 min read
Illustration of woman using AI.
iStock / Getty Images Plus
Classroom Technology 4 Things to Know About AI's 'Murky' Ethics
Teachers and high school students see plenty of ethical gray areas and potential for long-term problems with AI.
4 min read
Highway directional sign for AI Artificial Intelligence
Matjaz Boncina/iStock/Getty