Ed-Tech Policy News in Brief

Snap IPO Yields Millions for Private Calif. High School

By The Associated Press — March 07, 2017 1 min read
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A California high school has made millions of dollars from the initial public offering of shares in Snap Inc., the company behind the Snapchat photo-messaging application.

The board of the Saint Francis high school in Mountain View agreed to invest $15,000 in seed money in Snap in 2012, when the company was just getting started.

They had been invited to do so by one of the student’s parents, a venture capital investor, the high school president says in a letter issued to the school community Thursday.

The school held onto the investment until this week, when Snap shares sold for $17 each in an IPO. The share price rocketed 44 percent higher when trading began last week.

The school was quoted by media including the website Quartz as saying they sold two-thirds of their shares at $17 each, to raise $24 million.

“The school’s investment in Snap—which this morning announced the completion of its IPO—has matured and given us a significant boost,” said the high school president, Simon Chiu, in the letter.

A version of this article appeared in the March 08, 2017 edition of Education Week as Snap IPO Yields Millions for Private Calif. High School

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