Classroom Technology

Florida Officials Investigate Operator of Virtual Schools

By Jason Tomassini & The Associated Press — October 15, 2012 1 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

The Florida Department of Education is investigating K12 Inc., the nation’s largest for-profit online virtual education provider, over allegations the company uses uncertified teachers in violation of state law and has asked employees to cover up the practice. K12 Inc. officials allegedly asked state-certified teachers to sign class rosters that included students they hadn’t taught, according to documents that are part of the investigation, which began in January.

In one case, a K12 manager instructed a certified teacher to sign a class roster of more than 100 students, according to documents obtained by the Florida Center for Investigative Reporting and StateImpact Florida. But the documents show she only recognized seven names on that list.

“I cannot sign off on students who are not my actual students,” then-K12 teacher Amy Capelle wrote to her supervisor. “It is not ethical to submit records to the district that are inaccurate.”

Co-founded in 2000 by William J. Bennett, a former U.S. Education Secretary under President Ronald Reagan, K12 is an $864 million publicly traded company whose stock price has more than doubled in the last year. It operates in 43 Florida school districts, teaching everything from art to algebra to students in kindergarten through high school.

According to K12’s website, students enjoy “state-certified teachers, with a parent or other responsible adult in the role of ‘Learning Coach.’ ” And in a statement to the Florida Center for Investigative Reporting and StateImpact Florida, K12 Inc. spokesman Jeff Kwitowski denied the allegations. “K12 teachers assigned to teach students in Florida are state-certified,” he said.

A version of this article appeared in the October 17, 2012 edition of Digital Directions as Florida Officials Investigate Operator of Virtual Schools

Events

Recruitment & Retention Live Online Discussion A Seat at the Table: Chronic Teacher Shortage: Where Do We Go From Here?  
Join Peter DeWitt, Michael Fullan, and guests for expert insights into finding solutions for the teacher shortage.
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Science Webinar
Close the Gender Gap: Getting Girls Excited about STEM
Join female STEM leaders as they discuss the importance of early cheerleaders, real life role models, and female networks of support.
Content provided by Logitech
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Student Achievement Webinar
Mission Possible: Saving Time While Improving Student Outcomes
Learn how district leaders are maximizing instructional time and finding the best resources for student success through their MTSS framework.
Content provided by Panorama Education

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Classroom Technology Opinion How to Co-Exist With Tech Is ChatGPT’s Lesson
"The AI-generated work raises the bar of output quality expected from students," says this letter to the editor.
1 min read
Education Week opinion letters submissions
Gwen Keraval for Education Week
Classroom Technology Most Teens Learn About Climate Change From Social Media. Why Schools Should Care
Teens are getting information on climate change from YouTube and Facebook, underscoring the need to teach media literacy in schools.
9 min read
Illustration of mobile phones, tablet and laptops with different climates.
Dan Page for Education Week
Classroom Technology Can Digital Tools Detect ChatGPT-Inspired Cheating?
Tools purporting to detect AI writing may help teachers but they come with their own set of complexities.
7 min read
Image of a examining a piece of written material.
ojogabonitoo/iStock/Getty + EdWeek