Data News in Brief

Collection and Use of Student Data Found to Be Growing in States

By McClatchy-Tribune — December 03, 2013 1 min read

• Parents in 14 states can access electronic data about their children.

Among the report’s findings:

  • Teachers this year can access information about their students through secure websites or portals in 35 states, an increase from 28 in 2011.
  • In 17 states, teacher-training programs can tap into information about how their graduates are performing in the classroom, up from six in 2011.
  • Parents in 14 states can access electronic data about their children.
  • Thirty-one states use data to identify the students most at risk of academic failure or dropping out, up from 18 in 2011.

The survey was taken in the summer and includes results from the District of Columbia and every state except California, which declined to participate.

The report also highlights challenges for schools and states handling student data, such as the need to ensure privacy. Oklahoma, for example, passed legislation this year establishing safeguards around the collection and use of student data.

And several states that had signed up to work with inBloom, an Atlanta-based nonprofit that collects and stores student data for districts, have since backed off because of security concerns. In New York, parents are suing to stop the state education department from working with inBloom.

A version of this article appeared in the December 04, 2013 edition of Education Week as Collection and Use of Student Data Found to Be Growing in States

Events

Student Well-Being Webinar Boosting Teacher and Student Motivation During the Pandemic: What It Takes
Join Alyson Klein and her expert guests for practical tips and discussion on how to keep students and teachers motivated as the pandemic drags on.
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Student Well-Being Webinar
A Holistic Approach to Social-Emotional Learning
Register to learn about the components and benefits of holistically implemented SEL.
Content provided by Committee for Children
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Student Well-Being Webinar
How Principals Can Support Student Well-Being During COVID
Join this webinar for tips on how to support and prioritize student health and well-being during COVID.
Content provided by Unruly Studios

EdWeek Top School Jobs

CCLC Program Site Director
Thornton, CO, US
Adams 12 Five Star Schools
Customer Support Specialist, Tier 1
Portland, OR, US
Northwest Evaluation Association
Customer Support Specialist, Tier 1
Portland, OR, US
Northwest Evaluation Association
Customer Support Specialist, Tier 1
Portland, OR, US
Northwest Evaluation Association

Read Next

Data Spotlight Spotlight on Student Data
In this Spotlight, discover how students perform on national tests and more.
Data Using Student Data to Identify Future Criminals: A Privacy Debacle
A police department uses sensitive school data to keep a secret list of students it deems as at risk of engaging in criminal behavior.
8 min read
Silhouette of group of students with data overlay.
iStock/Getty Images Plus
Data Knowing How Students and Teachers Use Tech Is Vital
Data on the usage of educational technology tools can provide districts with a helpful road map for improving student engagement under remote, in-person, or hybrid learning conditions. See how school districts are using such data to make smart, strategic decisions.
5 min read
Ainslie Illig, 8, works on her computer at home in Ebensburg, Pa., during school closures last spring. Schools are putting together strategies for improving student and teacher engagement with online learning tools for the 2020-21 academic year.
Ainslie Illig, 8, works on her computer at home in Ebensburg, Pa., during school closures last spring. Schools are putting together strategies for improving student and teacher engagement with online learning tools for the 2020-21 academic year.
Kara Illig via AP
Data Thousands of Schools Are Falling Short on Students' Data Privacy Rights, Report Says
Parents and students can opt out from schools disclosing personal information, but many schools don't make that option clear to families.
3 min read