Special Education News in Brief

U.S. Supreme Court Declines to Hear Education Cases

By Mark Walsh — April 14, 2015 1 min read
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The U.S. Supreme Court in the past two weeks has declined to step into three education-related cases.

In the latest, Allston v. Lower Merion School District, the justices refused without comment to hear the appeal of seven students and their parents who argued that a Pennsylvania district systematically funneled a disproportionate number of black students into special education.

In Dariano v. Morgan Hill Unified School District, the justices also refused to hear an appeal brought by California high school students who were barred from wearing American-flag apparel during a Cinco de Mayo celebration at their school.

And in Bronx Household of Faith v. Board of Education of the City of New York, the justices declined for the third time to get involved in a dispute between a small church congregation and the nation’s largest school system over the use of schools for religious services. A federal appeals court most recently ruled in favor of the district.

A version of this article appeared in the April 15, 2015 edition of Education Week as U.S. Supreme Court Declines to Hear Education Cases

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