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Special Education

By Christina A. Samuels — March 24, 2015 1 min read

A little more than 2 percent of the nation’s school districts—347 in all—were flagged by their states for overidentifying minorities for special education.

That means those districts are required to spend 15 percent of their federal special education dollars to address the problem through programs aimed primarily at students from kindergarten to 3rd grade.

The numbers were unearthed by the Advocacy Institute, and published earlier this month on the IDEA Money Watch website. The districts flagged span 25 states and one-third of them—104—were in just one state: Louisiana.

The figures, drawn from federal data, are current as of the 2011-12 school year.

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A version of this article appeared in the March 25, 2015 edition of Education Week as Special Education

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